Archive for the ‘Biophotonics’ category

Google Glass 2.0 Is a Startling Second Act

July 21, 2017

AR/VR applications continue to be developed.  Anyone who thinks this is going away needs to buy stock in buggy whips.

The trendy-creepy glasses flopped. Then the tech giant realized that the future of wearables was in factories and warehouses.

The original Glass designers had starry-eyed visions of masses blissfully living their lives in tandem with a wraparound frame and a tiny computer screen hovering over their eye. But the dream quickly gave way to disillusionment as early adopters found that it delivered less than it promised—and users became the target of shaming from outsiders concerned about privacy. Within three years, Alphabet (the parent company of Google and its sister company, the “moonshot factory” called X) had given up Glass for good—or so people assumed.

What they didn’t know was that Alphabet was commissioning a small group to develop a version for the workplace.

Read more.  It’s good: Google Glass 2.0 Is a Startling Second Act | WIRED

UB’s Paras Prasad Named Fellow of National Academy of Inventors

January 2, 2017

University at Buffalo researcher Paras Prasad, an internationally recognized expert in optics and photonics, has been named a Fellow of the nailogoNational Academy of Inventors (NAI).

NAI Fellow is the highest professional distinction accorded by the organization to academic researchers who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development and the welfare of society.paras-prasad

Among other individuals, the list of NAI Fellowsincludes presidents and senior leaders of research universities and nonprofit research institutes, Nobel Laureates, and recipients of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation and U.S. National Medal of Science.

New fellows will be inducted at a ceremony on April 6 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston, Massachusetts.

Prasad, PhD, serves as the executive director of UB’s Institute for Lasers, Photonics and Biophotonics (ILPB). He is a SUNY Distinguished Professor in the departments of Chemistry, Physics, Medicine and Electrical Engineering.

Prasad was an early pioneer in nanomedicine, which uses super-small particles, materials and devices to treat and diagnose disease.

He specializes in the use of optics, photonics and nanotechnology in this field, and has worked with colleagues to study and develop a wide range of new materials that could ultimately improve lives around the world.

These novel materials include miniature luminescent crystals that could be used in image-guided surgery; light-activated nanoparticles that could enable the development of new bioimaging technologies for disease detection; new nanoneurotechnologies for monitoring and enhancing brain functions; and magnetic and laser-activated nanoparticles that could be used for cancer diagnosis and treatment. This latter technology was licensed to UB spinoff Nanobiotix, a publicly traded company and leader in nanomedicine that has maintained close contact with Prasad while working to develop these and other new nanomedicine products.

Prasad has published more than 750 scientific papers, eight edited books and four monographs, and has been named the inventor or co-inventor on numerous patents. In keeping with his emphasis on the translational impact of his research, Prasad has been extremely active in launching startup companies and partnering with industry for co-development of technologies to create new companies. His efforts have led to 9 different companies worldwide.

He has received numerous regional, national and international recognitions for his lifetime achievements, including the Morley Medal; Jacob F. Schoellkopf Medal; Guggenheim Fellowship; Sloan Fellowship; Western New York Health Care Industries Technology/Discovery Award; and Excellence in Pursuit of Knowledge Award of the Research Foundation for SUNY. He was named a fellow of the American Physical Society, OSA (the Optical Society) and SPIE (the international society for optics and photonics).

This year, SPIE awarded him the society’s highest honor: the Gold Medal. The University at Buffalo awarded him the high honor of the UB President’s Medal in 2016 in recognition of extraordinary service to the university, and he also received UB’s inaugural Innovation Impact Award in 2015 for his contributions to the invention of the technologies licensed to Nanobiotix.

In 2005, he was named one of the “Scientific American 50,” the magazine’s list of “visionaries from the worlds of research, industry and politics whose recent accomplishments point toward a brighter technological future for everyone.” He was on the Thomson Reuters “Highly Cited Researchers” list for 2014 and 2016.

Prasad has received honorary doctorates from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden; the Aix-Marseille University in France; and the National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI) in Russia.

The National Academy of Inventors is a nonprofit member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and governmental and nonprofit research institutes, with over 3,000 individual inventor members and fellows spanning more than 200 institutions. The academy was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office; enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation; encourage the disclosure of intellectual property; educate and mentor innovative students; and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

From the Same Folks That Brought Us Stars, Photosynthesis and the Universe

September 8, 2016

What can a single molecule do? Plenty–especially as it interacts with light. Today, the science of molecular photonics, loosely defined as the interaction of light with a molecule or molecules and perhaps best exemplified by the natural process of photosynthesis and the Holy Grail that is a molecular computer, is an emerging discipline that is gaining prominence as evidenced by a growing number of institutions focused on the subject.

usimolecular

>>Read More Here<<

Laser World of Photonics, Munich

June 21, 2015

“Laser Munich” begins tomorrow. The largest photonics conference in Europe. NYPhotonics is here!

IMG_6384
Adam Dunn and Jürgen Kantner in front of a statue of Joseph von Fraunhofer, the famed Bavarian and one of the fathers of modern optics.

Mobile-phone Microscope Detects Eye Parasite

May 12, 2015

We are living in a transformative age of photonics potential! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iyzzg7dTuvY https://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2015/05/06/video-cellscope-automates-detection-of-parasites/

20 Illuminating Facts About Light

January 19, 2015

In celebration of the International Year of Light, Perimeter Institute presents 20 fascinating factoids about photons:

http://perimeterinstitute.ca/news/20-illuminating-enlightening-day-brightening-facts-about-light?cm_mid=4290135&cm_crmid=d0a17731-1812-e211-858f-005056800012

 

Photonics Technology Makes the Cut on New Request For Information

June 4, 2014

“If China shuts off the flow of glass, the United States will be out of drones in six months.”
– CEO of a critical components contractor to the DoD

It was anticipated and heavily lobbied for.  Does it look like anyone expected?

On Monday, June 2nd, the Department of the Air Force, through Air Force Material Command (Wright Patterson) issued a request for information (RFI) seeking input from Industry and Academia as part of an effort to select and scope the technology focus areas for future Institutes for Manufacturing Innovation (IMIs).

The NNMI program was announced by president Obama in 2012.  Unable to budget the money to fund the hallmark manufacturing initiative, the administration has turned to various DOD and government agencies to fund NMI’s on its behalf.  This is the first from Air Force Material Command.

Responses are due by July 14th.

Technology areas of focus:

  • Flexible Hybrid Electronics
  • Photonics
  • Engineered Nanomaterials
  • Fiber and Textiles
  • Electronic Packaging and Reliability
  • Aerospace Composites

Many of us are elated that photonics made the cut.  Hundreds of hours of work, lobbying and thousands of dollars in travel have resulted in Photonics being on the short list for this NMI.  What is not clear is if the White House and the DoD recognize the critical role that optics, photonics and imaging technologies play to our national security.  Interpretations will vary.

From the RFI:

The term “photonics” refers specifically to technologies for generating, transmitting, modulating, filtering, processing, switching, amplifying, attenuating and detecting light.  Photonics technologies encompass significant commercial industries and solutions for DoD unique applications.  The diverse photonics industry has a number of manufacturing approaches where a public-private investment could rapidly accelerate the technology availability from TRL 4 to TRL 6/7 and enable a sustainable industry for commercial and DoD needs.  A photonics IMI would address industrial base issues for photonics materials, such as infrared materials, nonlinear materials, low-dimensional materials, and engineered materials which are critical to our Nation’s photonics ecosystem (production, DoD, research, etc….).  A Photonics IMI could be structured to allow improvements in the cross-cutting disciplines of design, packaging, reliability and test to be applied across multiple technology topic areas leveraging common manufacturing approaches.  Preference could be given to technology topic areas that are in late stage research and development, that may require some design/foundry efforts, but the bulk of the efforts are in the packaging, reliability and test disciplines, increasing the probability that the technology will mature and transition to DoD weapon systems and/or commercial platforms in 3-5 years and enabling the institute to be self-sustaining in the 5-7 year timeframe.

Although much research and development on photonics has been done in the U.S., it has been primarily carried out by large corporations developing and using proprietary processes for application-driven designs.  Little coordination and cooperation has existed between companies.  As a result, U.S.-based photonics research and development is faced with several disadvantages:

    1. There is no common or generic component library or fabrication process.  There are almost as many technologies as photonics companies.
    2. For most potential new applications, the market is too small for payback of investments without cooperative development. 

Photonic technologies are commonly used in the high speed transmission of signals in telecommunications and high-performance information-processing systems.  In addition photonics technologies are used in high-performance information-processing systems and computing.  Finally photonic technologies are commonly used in sensors and imagers.

A lot of players around the country will be very busy crafting their responses in the next month.