Archive for the ‘Economic Development’ category

2016 Annual Meeting Follow-up

November 7, 2016

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Thank you, friends in photonics, for supporting the New York Photonics Annual Meeting and our economic development agenda.

A special thank-you to our sponsors, without whom we would not be in a position to advocate for the region’s optics, photonics & imaging industry.

We hope that you enjoyed hearing from Secretary of Energy, Ernest Moniz, senator Chuck Schumer and congresswoman Louise Slaughter, and we hope that you recognize what tremendous advocates we have for our industry in Washington.

To reiterate this year’s priorities from the meeting:

  • Our region has a legacy in optics, photonics and imaging like no place else in America, and we have won numerous opportunities for leveraging our strategic advantages for the future.  At this stage, it is up to the community stakeholders – the region’s economic development partners and the industry – to make that happen.  The New York Photonics ecosystem is robust and prime for further development.
  • We are advocates – and we hope that we can count on your support – for the Rochester Museum & Science Center’s capital campaign, Gateway Project, and Strasenburgh Planetarium upgrades.  We see the RMSC as the point where all vectors intersect: education, tourism, economic development, and the arts.  We envision the RMSC campus as an international center for light, astronomy, multimedia and education, and we feel that this proect deserves the support of the Finger Lakes Regional Council and the Upstate Revitalization Initiative, Finger Lakes Forward.
  • Also as part of Finger Lakes Forward, we continue to advocate for the Finger Lakes Regional Center for Optics Manufacturing, a national center for manufacturing innovation and problem solving for America’s optics, photonics & imaging industry and national security.  We cannot imagine another effort that will more effectively leverage our strategic advantages in optics, photonics and imaging.  You will be hearing more about this center in the future.

The Demo

People seemed to enjoy the demonstration of state-of-the-art planetarium projection technology!  Some clarification is needed, however.

The system that we experienced on the 27th was a demonstration of what is possible.  What we saw was a 4K projection system, meaning that we experienced 4,000 pixels from horizon to horizon through the zenith of the dome.  This is the entry level for what we would like to see in the Strasenburgh Planetarium, including filling the central pit, expanded seating, and a new projection surface for the dome.

We see it as the beginning of new possibilities for Rochester’s planetarium in addition to the brilliant astronomy that will already enjoy, only in HD – including multimedia events and new kinds of full-dome programming – all of course, accelerated by integrated photonics!

Handouts, or are they E-outs?

For more about planetarium full dome possibilities, click here.

For those of you who requested the presentations from the Planetarium portion of the meeting, you can find them here.  For the animations to work from my presentation you will need to download it.  We are unable to share Ed White’s AIM Photonics presentation for security reasons.

Photographs from the event can be found here.  You may find yourself somewhere in these shots!

News about the awards is here.

Thank you again for joining us on the 27th and thank you for your continued support!

 

Career Opportunities in Optics, Photonics & Imaging

August 17, 2016

Photonics jobs: Preparing today for future openings​

Top leaders at the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics) say the projected optical technician jobs won’t be here for at least two or three years. That means anyone looking for a future photonics job has 25 months to learn more about the industry.

>>Read more here<<

East High School Summer Optics Team Polishing 1/10th Wave Optics

July 21, 2016

Don’t know what that means?  Read on…

These are the only high school students in the nation manufacturing precision optics, and they are doing it during a summer immersion program this July in the East High School Optics Manufacturing Lab.

The scorecard:

“Yesterday, July 20, Alejandra’s optics measured 1/7th wave.”

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Congresswoman Louise Slaughter (center), a long time advocate for Rochester’s Optics and Photonics Industry pictured with Adele Ratcliff, Undersecretery for DOD Supply Chain and Manufacturing (second from Left) and the East High Manufacturing team, including teacher Paul Conrow (back row, forth from left)

“Today, Demier Hill’s part measured to 1/10th wave on the Zygo interferometer.”

What does that mean?

Surface flatness is a type of surface accuracy specification that measures the deviation of a flat surface such as that of amirror, window, prism, or plano-lens. This deviation can be measured using an optical flat, which is a high quality, highly precise flat reference surface used to compare the flatness of a test piece. When the flat surface of the test optic is placed against the optical flat, fringes appear whose shape dictates the surface flatness of the optic under inspection. If the fringes are evenly spaced, straight, and parallel, then the optical surface under test is at least as flat as the reference optical flat. If the fringes are curved, the number of fringes between two imaginary lines, one tangent to the center of a fringe and one through the ends of that same fringe, indicate the flatness error. The deviations in flatness are often measured in values of waves (λ), which are multiples of the wavelength of the testing source. One fringe corresponds to ½ of a wave. 1λ flatness is considered typical grade, λ/4 flatness is considered to be precision grade, and λ/20 is considered high precision grade.

These students are achieving professional level results in terms of surface flatness, and are on their way towards possible careers in the optics, photonics and imaging industry.

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A Manufacturer’s Commitment to a Strong Future Workforce #fivepercentpledge

June 24, 2016

You don’t have to simply hope that there will be a skilled workforce available when your workforce begins to retire.  You can actually do something about it now.

Sign the 5% Pledge and pay it forward.  For every 20 employees in your organization hire one temporary intern, co-op, high school student or long-term unemployed individual this summer.  It is a simple idea that will have a valuable pay off in your company’s future.  It has worked for your colleagues and it can work for you.The 5% Pledge

Sign the 5% Pledge

#fivepercentpledge

Successful Optics & Photonics Careers Can Start with a Two Year Degree

June 23, 2016

Has the decades-long march to college-for-everyone-at-18 actually closed off options for teenagers and 20-somethings, rather than opened up opportunities?

We all know teen-aged kids with potential that seem to “underperform” when pursuing a four-year degree.  We also know college grads saddled with debt, who can’t find jobs in their chosen fields.

Maybe a technical certificate that can get you earning or a two-year degree in Optics & Photonics are smart investments.  Monroe Community College offers both in an “in-demand” job market.

Three years ago, the Corning Incorporated Foundation invested $500,000 into improving the MCC program, matched with another $250,000 from Sydor Optics.  Why do you think that is?  The MCC program is the only program of its kind in the nation, and both companies, as other companies do, hire graduates of the program.

The same is true for so many technical and vocational programs offered in the region and across the country.  Why then do some parents continue to spend more for their children to attend four-year colleges than they do on their house?  Is it really nothing more than a gamble?

Nearly 40 percent of American workers hold a bachelor’s degree. College graduates are found in virtually every profession: 15 percent of mail carriers have a four-year degree, as do one in five clerical and sales workers and 83,000 bartenders.

>>Read More Here<<

 

Optics & Photonics Investments Will Continue To Spur Regional Economic Growth

April 1, 2016

In August, Vice President Joe Biden, U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter and Gov. Andrew Cuomo designated Rochester as headquarters for a $650 million integrated photonics startup, AIM Photonics. The intent of the institute is to design and build computer chips that use light (photons), rather than electronics (electrons), wherever possible. The technology has broad transformational potential across all industries and positions our state and city as potential big winners in this high-stakes effort, with new companies and new engineering and manufacturing jobs.

The Finger Lakes region also won one of New York’s coveted Upstate Revitalization Initiative awards of $500 million over five years, with optics and photonics a key economic pillar. This separate award holds extraordinary potential for our region, and for New York.

The members of New York Photonics approach this responsibility seriously. A transformational project of the sort that will leverage our technical, educational and intellectual resources takes time to cultivate.

>Read More Here<<

 

Governor Andrew Cuomo & FLX Forward Announce Two New Photonics Company Moves to #ROC

March 16, 2016

FLX Forward and Governor Cuomo announce the move of two new photonics companies to EASTMAN Business Park.

Avogy and Photonica. 1400 new jobs.  Over $1billion investment.

Over one dozen New York Photonics CEO’s in the room, including Sydor, Optimax, Optipro, CEIS, RPO, JML.

 

The press release:

GOVERNOR CUOMO ANNOUNCES LEADING PHOTONICS COMPANIES TO INVEST $1.6 BILLION IN ROCHESTER, CREATING MORE THAN 1,400 NEW JOBS

Photonics Company Avogy to Move Headquarters from Silicon Valley to Rochester; Together with Photonica, will Locate Advanced Development and Early Manufacturing at Eastman Business Park

Major Photonics Investment Supports Region’s Strategic URI Plan “Finger Lakes Forward”

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that two leading photonics companies, Avogy and Photonica, will invest $1.6 billion and create more than 1,400 new high-tech jobs in Rochester. The investment comes on the heels of the $600 million Integrated Photonics Institute for Manufacturing Innovation announced in July by Governor Cuomo and Vice President Biden at SUNY Polytechnic Institute’s Rochester-region facility at Canal Ponds.

“This marks a transformative moment for Rochester that will fuel economic growth, create jobs and further secure this region’s place as the photonics capital of the nation,” Governor Cuomo said. “By bringing this proven nanotechnology-driven economic development model to Rochester, we are attracting big businesses and building a thriving 21st century economy. Major investments like this are driving our momentum as we ensure that the economic resurgence continues in Upstate New York.”

Under Phase I of the innovative partnership between Photonica, Avogy and SUNY Poly on behalf of New York State, the two companies will locate their advanced development, prototyping, and early manufacturing operations at Canal Ponds’ cleanroom facilities, with a Phase II placement of manufacturing operations at the Eastman Business Park. Both companies will locate headquarters and business operations at SUNY Poly’s recently announced photonics headquarters and technology accelerator at Legacy Tower.

Combined under Phase I, Avogy and Photonica will invest more than $1.6 billion over five years and create and support more than 1,400 new high-tech jobs. The companies join dozens of academic, government, and industry partners from across the country led by SUNY Poly to secure the nation’s leadership in emerging technology research, development, and manufacturing.

In Phase I, Photonica will create and support 400 new jobs in Rochester, including facility operations at Canal Ponds and Eastman Business Park, additional supplier companies, and co-located industry partners. The total project investment of $700 million over the next five years includes $35 million by the state to purchase equipment and upgrade infrastructure and cleanroom space at Canal Ponds and Eastman Business Park.

Also under Phase I, Avogy will move operations to Rochester from Silicon Valley. The company has developed industry-first high efficiency low cost power electronics technology that are smaller, lighter, more reliable, and with significantly less energy usage. Its products have both commercial and industrial uses and include breakthroughs on portable charging devices, in-home power management, and future applications in data centers and electric vehicles.

Photonica currently has business operations around the world and is a leader in next-generation visual and display technologies with applications ranging from virtual reality devices UltraHD resolution and large video displays and televisions, flexible and curved video displays, 3D displays, consumer mobile devices, and to military and national defense and mass consumer and business markets. The company currently works closely with the Navy and Air Force as well as leading consumer electronics and semiconductor manufacturers.

Avogy will scale up production of its current technologies with high volume manufacturing in Rochester and will employ nearly 400 workers with an average salary of more than $80,000 within the first five years, and its suppliers and high tech business partners will generate more than 600 additional support jobs. Total project investment of $950 million includes $40 million by the state for necessary tools and infrastructure upgrades at Canal Ponds and Eastman Business Park to support advanced manufacturing.