Archive for the ‘Education & Training’ category

Rochester – Jena Relationship Strengthens with Visit by Thüringen Prime Minister and Delegation

May 16, 2017

Bodo Ramelow, Prime Minister of Thuringia, Germany, and a delegation of scientists and dignitaries visited Rochester on May 14 and 15. The purpose of the visit was to advance the scientific, academic research and business relationship between Rochester and Jena, two “sister cities of light.”

The ‘sister cities’ of Jena and Rochester (USA) have a lot in common: in Jena, as in Rochester, an optics industry has developed since the 19th century together with a strong supplier network. While in Jena the collaboration between Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe significantly furthered optics research, soon after in Rochester, local industrialists George Eastman (Eastman Kodak) and Edward Bausch (Bausch & Lomb) founded an optics institute at the university. In fact, Eastman visited Jena at least once in 1911, and must have recognized the city as the center of Europe’s optics industry. Since then there have been many changes. Today, both regions are enormously strong locations for the optics and photonics industry and research.

For more articles about the relationship development search here.

Andreas Tünnerman, Director, Fraunhofer IOF and Bodo Ramelow, Prime Minister of Thuringia

On Monday morning, May 15th, together with the German delegation; Rochester Museum & Science Center (RMSC) president, Kate Bennett and vice president, Dan Menelly, and RMSC board and staff, Prime Minister Ramelow and Andreas Tünnermann, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Mechanics  donated a laser hologram to the RMSC’s permanent optics exhibit. The hologram displays the skylines of Rochester and Jena, side by side, beneath the words “We Love Photonics.”

The Fraunhofer Institute is recognized as the leading public/privately-funded organization for applied research in Europe (and the West) with an annual budget exceeding $2 billion Euro.

The color-tunable laser projected image celebrates “light-based” relationship of the two cities

The New York Photonics cluster began developing a relationship with Fraunhofer IOF in 2014, while lobbying for the National Photonics Initiative and a national institute for photonics manufacturing. The following year a team led by New York State was awarded $110 million from the Department of Defense as part of the >$620 million AIM Photonics effort for developing America’s manufacturing capacity in integrated photonics.

On Sunday night Prime Minister Ramelow hosted a dinner and reception in Rochester with faculty from University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology and Tom Battley, Executive Director of New York Photonics.

 

The delegation and attendees at the RMSC presentation ceremony, bathed in light.

Carl, the Zeiss Star Projector in the Strasenurgh Planetarium, Rochester Museum & Science Center

 

 

New York Photonics is a not-for-profit organization founded to promote and enhance the New York State optics, photonics and imaging industry by fostering the cooperation of business, academia and government.

East High School Precision Optics Manufacturing Lab: Coating Chamber Functional!

December 22, 2016

The East High Optical Fabrication laboratory recently added coating capabilities with a Denton DV-502A coating chamber.14095696_1755989041351249_5795386981671000285_n

Patrick Iulianello,Vice President Operations at Accucoat (Rochester, NY) recently helped East High Precision Optics Manufacturing students with their first aluminum mirror coating efforts on 2″ plano discs (made in the lab).  Accucoat also helped with some custom tooling for the chamber.

Next up: copper coating!

East High School is the only high school in the country with a precision optical manufacturing lab.
The comprehensive laboratory at East High School is the envy of colleges and universities.accucoat-logo
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New Partnership Between the Optics Regions Rochester and Jena

September 12, 2016

The ‘sister cities’ of Jena and Rochester (USA) have a lot in common: Here, as there, an optics industry has developed since the 19th century together with suppliers. While in Jena the collaboration between Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe significantly furthered optics research, soon after in Rochester, local industrialists George Eastman (Eastman Kodak) and Edward Bausch (Bausch & Lomb) founded an optics institute at the university. Since then there have been many changes. Today, both regions are enormously strong locations for the optics and photonics industry and research.

The University of Rochester and Friedrich Schiller University Jen sign a Memorandum of Understanding for the ERASMUS program. The event was held in the Welles-Brown Room of Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester's River Campus, Rochester, NY, Monday, September 12, 2016. In the front row from left to right: Andrew Berger, Jane Gatewood, Wendi Heinzelman, Walter Rosenthal, Claudia Hillinger, and Tom Brown. In the rear from left to right: Kevin Füchsel and Andreas Tünnermann.

The University of Rochester and Friedrich Schiller University Jena sign a Memorandum of Understanding for the ERASMUS program. The event was held in the Welles-Brown Room of Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester’s River Campus, Rochester, NY, Monday, September 12, 2016. In the front row from left to right: Andrew Berger, Jane Gatewood, Wendi Heinzelman, Walter Rosenthal, Claudia Hillinger, and Tom Brown. In the rear from left to right: Kevin Füchsel and Andreas Tünnermann.

Source: New partnership between the optics region Rochester and Jena – Fraunhofer IOF

Rochester’s Alexis Vogt, Honored Among 2016 “40 under 40”

September 9, 2016

On the heels of 2015’s International Year of Light, Rochester, New York is achieving greater recognition for its preeminence in optics, photonics and imaging. Rochester’s 2015 designation as headquarters for AIM Photonics will bring with it a new Test, Assembly & Packaging plant to begin construction in 2017, with new jobs, new technologies and new skill set demands.

It seems fitting that 2016 is the year that the community has chosen to recognize one of Rochester’s “optics shining stars,” Alexis Vogt as one of our “40 under 40.”vogt-pic

Vogt, currently Endowed Chair & Associate Professor of Optics at Monroe Community College in Rochester, NY, teaches in the only Optical Systems Technology program in the nation.  The program is at maximum enrollment for Fall, 2016.

A PhD from the University of Rochester Institute of Optics with a specialized emphasis on polarization engineering, coherence theory and microscopy, Vogt has already achieved career objectives that many people only dream about.

While engaged in her UR studies Vogt had already achieved distinction:

  • Dean’s List 10 of 10 semesters and Tau Beta Pi National Honorary Engineering Society
  • Recipient of 2000 Institute of Optics Faculty Award
  • Recipient of 2001 Undergraduate Teaching Award
  • University of Rochester Trustees’ Alumni Council of the College member 2001 – 2004

She interned at Corning, Inc. in metrology for optical fiber, where she designed and developed certification devices to increase accuracy and reliability of fiber draws.

In her spare time, she defined “light” and “polarization” for the World Book Encyclopedia, got married and had two children.

At Bausch & Lomb she was manager of medical affairs in the advanced optical design and metrology department where she was awarded the 2012 CEO Award Recipient for “directly showcasing Bausch + Lomb optical designs to eye care professionals in a compelling and engaging way…” and the 2011 Focus on Excellence award.

As an optical physicist, Vogt was applications engineer, business development manager and senior product manager at Melles Griot in Rochester, where she was awarded the 2015 IDEX KEEP Award for high performance and was offered financial incentives to remain at IDEX.

She instead chose an endowed professorship at MCC in optical systems technology.

“Each day I reflect on how fortunate and blessed I am to have such a wonderful family, and a job that I love in a community I love.” Says Vogt. ” The birthplace of optics in America is Rochester, NY, and to be educating students at Monroe Community College and helping them prepare for a career in optics, photonics and imaging is incredibly rewarding.  The only limit to what they can do is their own ambition.  We have CEOs in Rochester with a 2-year degree from our program.”

“As we move forward and grow our optics program to meet the increasing regional and national optics workforce demands, I want more families to encourage their children to pursue interests in science and physics, especially their daughters.” 

Alexis’ last name, Vogt, has her at the bottom of the list alphabetically, but we think that she belongs at the top!  

We are delighted that she will be a speaker at the New York Photonics Annual meeting in Rochester on October 27th.

>>Awardees Here<<

Rochester Mini Maker Faire Call for Participants

August 18, 2016

Project submission deadlines are in September.

The Faire will be held at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center on Saturday, November 19th.

Calling all makers, crafters, tinkerers, and artists: the application for the third annual Rochester Mini Maker Faire is now open!

On November 19th  from 9am to 5pm at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center, Rochester celebrates the act of Making with attractions, exhibits, talks, demonstrations, and performances showcasing the intersection of science, technology, arts, and crafts — many of them immersive and interactive.

Rochester Mini Maker Faire attracts a broad array of people and exposes them to technology, art, and engineering. Dan Schneiderman, co-chair of Rochester Mini Maker Faire and NYS representative of the White House Nation of Makers Initiative, says,  “Maker Faire brings everyone together: from kids to grandparents, artists to engineers, professionals to hobbyists. Anyone with a passion for making.”
>>Read More Here<<

Career Opportunities in Optics, Photonics & Imaging

August 17, 2016

Photonics jobs: Preparing today for future openings​

Top leaders at the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics) say the projected optical technician jobs won’t be here for at least two or three years. That means anyone looking for a future photonics job has 25 months to learn more about the industry.

>>Read more here<<

East High School Summer Optics Team Polishing 1/10th Wave Optics

July 21, 2016

Don’t know what that means?  Read on…

These are the only high school students in the nation manufacturing precision optics, and they are doing it during a summer immersion program this July in the East High School Optics Manufacturing Lab.

The scorecard:

“Yesterday, July 20, Alejandra’s optics measured 1/7th wave.”

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Congresswoman Louise Slaughter (center), a long time advocate for Rochester’s Optics and Photonics Industry pictured with Adele Ratcliff, Undersecretery for DOD Supply Chain and Manufacturing (second from Left) and the East High Manufacturing team, including teacher Paul Conrow (back row, forth from left)

“Today, Demier Hill’s part measured to 1/10th wave on the Zygo interferometer.”

What does that mean?

Surface flatness is a type of surface accuracy specification that measures the deviation of a flat surface such as that of amirror, window, prism, or plano-lens. This deviation can be measured using an optical flat, which is a high quality, highly precise flat reference surface used to compare the flatness of a test piece. When the flat surface of the test optic is placed against the optical flat, fringes appear whose shape dictates the surface flatness of the optic under inspection. If the fringes are evenly spaced, straight, and parallel, then the optical surface under test is at least as flat as the reference optical flat. If the fringes are curved, the number of fringes between two imaginary lines, one tangent to the center of a fringe and one through the ends of that same fringe, indicate the flatness error. The deviations in flatness are often measured in values of waves (λ), which are multiples of the wavelength of the testing source. One fringe corresponds to ½ of a wave. 1λ flatness is considered typical grade, λ/4 flatness is considered to be precision grade, and λ/20 is considered high precision grade.

These students are achieving professional level results in terms of surface flatness, and are on their way towards possible careers in the optics, photonics and imaging industry.

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