Archive for the ‘Integrated Photonics’ category

Moving at the Speed of Light: an AIM Photonics Milestone

August 8, 2017

University of Arizona selected for high-impact, industrial demonstration of new integrated photonic cryogenic datalink for focal plane arrays

Program is major milestone for AIM Photonics

The American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics (AIM Photonics), a public-private partnership advancing the nation’s photonics manufacturing capabilities, today announced the winner of a proposal call for a new Defense Department Government Directed Project for photonic integrated circuit (PIC) data links for cryogenic focal plane arrays (FPAs).

The $1,200,000 U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) project, along with an additional $400,000 in matching funds from a team led by the University of Arizona (UA), will support a consortium that includes Sandia National Labs, Raytheon (RTN) and other aerospace firms engaged in FPA technology.

The project will encompass the design, fabrication and test of cryogenic PIC-based datalinks for FPA readout and has the potential to strongly advance imaging capabilities for national defense applications. Capitalizing on the national reach and capabilities of this unique consortium, the PICs at the heart of the project will be manufactured in the AIM Photonics silicon photonics fabrication facility at SUNY Polytechnic Institute in Albany, New York, and could also lead to fabrication opportunities at AIM Photonics’ Test, Assembly, and Packaging (TAP) facility, which is being built in in Rochester, New York.

“When you consider the rapid pace of growth in both the FPA size and the required data rates, conventional electronic readouts become limited because they are both a heat source and a communication bottleneck,” says Dr. Robert Norwood, a Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, and Principal Investigator for the Program.

UA’s extensive experience in cryogenic FPAs and integrated photonics, working in concert with major contractors of the defense industrial base, will target a design and development methodology that provides a common PIC datalink solution across multiple system needs and environments.

“We are proud to partner with the DoD, the University of Arizona, and our industrial members in the development of this critical technology,” said Michael Liehr, Ph.D., CEO of AIM Photonics. “The design and development infrastructure we have developed is state-of-the-art, and a key benefit for the team as they create this next integrated photonics technology.”

Dr. Frank Jaworski, Program Manager, Emerging Technology, Raytheon Vision Systems, added, “Raytheon regards the integration of photonic integrated circuits with focal plane arrays as a critical path for the development of future DoD imaging systems vital to the nation’s security. We look forward to the University of Arizona’s leadership of the consortium and utilizing their expertise in developing this key technology.”

Neil Supola, Chief of the Infrared Focal Plane Array Branch at the Army’s Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, and Government Program Manager for AIM Photonics, noted that, “This program is a great opportunity for the Department of Defense to leverage advances in integrated photonics manufacturing being realized by the Manufacturing USA program together with its state, industrial, and academic partners. The scope of industrial participation on this project highlights the relevance photonic integration has within the DoD community, and this project’s inherent potential to make a large impact.”

Google Glass 2.0 Is a Startling Second Act

July 21, 2017

AR/VR applications continue to be developed.  Anyone who thinks this is going away needs to buy stock in buggy whips.

The trendy-creepy glasses flopped. Then the tech giant realized that the future of wearables was in factories and warehouses.

The original Glass designers had starry-eyed visions of masses blissfully living their lives in tandem with a wraparound frame and a tiny computer screen hovering over their eye. But the dream quickly gave way to disillusionment as early adopters found that it delivered less than it promised—and users became the target of shaming from outsiders concerned about privacy. Within three years, Alphabet (the parent company of Google and its sister company, the “moonshot factory” called X) had given up Glass for good—or so people assumed.

What they didn’t know was that Alphabet was commissioning a small group to develop a version for the workplace.

Read more.  It’s good: Google Glass 2.0 Is a Startling Second Act | WIRED

AIM Photonics Manufacturing IPSR Spring 2017 Meeting

February 24, 2017

AIM Photonics IPSR Spring Meeting>>AGENDA HERE<<

AIM Photonics TAP Facility Announced

December 14, 2016

Rochester, NY, December 14 2016

A former Eastman Kodak Co. building on Lake Avenue is the recommended site for the research hub of the nation’s national integrated photonics initiative, AIM Photonics, sources say — with a vote confirming the selection expected Wednesday morning.

The site is at the edge of Eastman Business Park, formerly Building 81 and now home to ON Semiconductor. The company will lease excess clean room, lab and office space for what is called the Testing, Assembly and Packaging facility, according to sources with knowledge of the recommendation.

Members of the state board overseeing American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics will vote on the site during a meeting in downtown Rochester, sources said, with Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-Fairport, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and others expected to attend. Howard Zemsky, head of Empire State Development, is expected to present the proposal.

>>Read More Here<<

From Empire State Development:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the state-of-the-art AIM Photonics Manufacturing Facility will be located in Eastman Business Park in Rochester at ON Semiconductor. The facility will be used to test, assemble and package chips that use photons in place of electrons for increased performance of semiconductor circuits. The New York State Photonics Board of Officers met today and unanimously recommended the new site.

First announced by Governor Cuomo with Vice President Joe Biden in July 2015, the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics will help secure the nation and region’s leadership in emerging technology research, development, and manufacturing. Optics, photonics and imaging is one of the three industry clusters identified in “Finger Lakes Forward,” the region’s successful Upstate Revitalization Initiative blueprint to grow the economy, create jobs and drive opportunity.

“The selection of ON Semiconductor further cements the Finger Lakes’ position at the forefront of the photonics industry and as a national leader in this emerging, high-growth field,” Governor Cuomo said. “With a long history of spearheading technological innovation, Rochester is delivering on a bold vision to revitalize the regional economy and jumpstart 21st century growth. It’s clear that our strategic investments in next generation industries are paying off – delivering high-paying jobs and driving the Finger Lakes forward.”

In September 2016, Empire State Development hired an independent site selector for the TAP facility to create a more efficient process at a lower cost to taxpayers. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, one of the world’s leading commercial real estate advisory firms, conducted a thorough review and evaluation of potential site locations based upon criteria and specifications developed in coordination with the United States Department of Defense and other key stakeholders. This independent process will save taxpayers tremendously, with at least $10 million in savings from original cost estimates pending final negotiations and approvals.

Empire State Development President, CEO & Commissioner Howard Zemsky said, “Using an independent, third party site selector allowed for the evaluation of multiple sites in the Greater Rochester region before Eastman Business Park was selected for the TAP facility. The new TAP facility will help secure the Finger Lakes leadership role in emerging technology research, development, and manufacturing and is further proof that the future shines bright for photonics in Rochester.”

The site selection process recommended ON Semiconductor, located in Building 81 at Eastman Business Park, based on its existing infrastructure, including a clean room; regional accessibility; and the fact that it had the highest “quality” score based on factors such as building functionality, operational needs and real estate terms. ON Semiconductor is also likely to meet the required project timing and has the ability to leverage significant existing building and system infrastructure. It is also located at the Eastman Business Park, which is a priority strategic site identified by the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council. An environmental review will be conducted by Empire State Development and the site is expected to be approved by the Empire State Development Board of Directors at a later date.

Bill Schromm, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at ON Semiconductor, said, “With energy efficient semiconductor expertise across a wide range of applications, ON Semiconductor is very familiar with the semiconductor processes and facilities required for manufacturing high performance power conversion, wireless, connected, and imaging solutions. Our Rochester operations at the EBP facility incorporate the design, wafer fabrication, assembly, packaging, and testing of imaging components and we have a unique, on-site infrastructure in place, including process engineers and technicians, cleanroom facilities technicians, maintenance technicians and an HSE specialist, to help support the implementation of the TAP center. Coupling that with existing, available cleanroom space, we believe we offered a strong solution for a fast, efficient and safe enablement the TAP facility. We are honored to be selected as the site where the industry’s expertise and partnerships will come together to drive integrated photonic solutions. We also look forward to identifying additional technical and business areas to collaborate with AIM/Photonics to help grow these emerging technologies locally and attract additional businesses and talent to the area.”

New York Photonics Talks Photons with Rochester Visitor Industry Council Leaders

September 21, 2016

… and quite the crowd they are!

This is the presentation that would not run on the AV system.
For those of you that attended, let me know how I did without the digital crutch!

Thank you, Visit Rochester: Don Jeffries, Denise DeSantis-Penwright, Greg LaDuca and our Photonics Liaison, Wendy Ford.vic
And thank you to all of the other industry professionals for the warm welcome and keen interest in photonics technology!

 

>>The PDF<<

55th Annual Institute of Optics Summer Course Series

May 24, 2016

The deadline for registration is May 31st.

Note: This year there are two new courses focused upon Integrated Photonics.

Courses:

For more details and on-line registration go to >>this link<<

Moore’s Law Reaches the Stop Sign (or at least the Yield sign)

February 26, 2016

Integrated Photonics could hold the breakthrough.

Next month, the worldwide semiconductor industry will formally acknowledge what has become increasingly obvious to everyone involved: Moore’s law, the principle that has powered the information-technology revolution since the 1960s, is nearing its end.

The doubling of transistors on a given piece of silicon real estate has already started to falter, thanks to the heat that is unavoidably generated when more and more silicon circuitry is jammed into the same small area. And some even more fundamental limits loom less than a decade away. Top-of-the-line microprocessors currently have circuit features that are around 14 nanometres across, smaller than most viruses. But by the early 2020s, says Paolo Gargini, chair of the road-mapping organization, “even with super-aggressive efforts, we’ll get to the 2–3-nanometre limit, where features are just 10 atoms across. Is that a device at all?” Probably not — if only because at that scale, electron behaviour will be governed by quantum uncertainties that will make transistors hopelessly unreliable. And despite vigorous research efforts, there is no obvious successor to today’s silicon technology.

>>Read More at Nature<<