Archive for the ‘Integrated Photonics’ category

AIM Photonics Manufacturing IPSR Spring 2017 Meeting

February 24, 2017

AIM Photonics IPSR Spring Meeting>>AGENDA HERE<<

AIM Photonics TAP Facility Announced

December 14, 2016

Rochester, NY, December 14 2016

A former Eastman Kodak Co. building on Lake Avenue is the recommended site for the research hub of the nation’s national integrated photonics initiative, AIM Photonics, sources say — with a vote confirming the selection expected Wednesday morning.

The site is at the edge of Eastman Business Park, formerly Building 81 and now home to ON Semiconductor. The company will lease excess clean room, lab and office space for what is called the Testing, Assembly and Packaging facility, according to sources with knowledge of the recommendation.

Members of the state board overseeing American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics will vote on the site during a meeting in downtown Rochester, sources said, with Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-Fairport, Gov. Andrew Cuomo and others expected to attend. Howard Zemsky, head of Empire State Development, is expected to present the proposal.

>>Read More Here<<

From Empire State Development:

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the state-of-the-art AIM Photonics Manufacturing Facility will be located in Eastman Business Park in Rochester at ON Semiconductor. The facility will be used to test, assemble and package chips that use photons in place of electrons for increased performance of semiconductor circuits. The New York State Photonics Board of Officers met today and unanimously recommended the new site.

First announced by Governor Cuomo with Vice President Joe Biden in July 2015, the American Institute for Manufacturing Integrated Photonics will help secure the nation and region’s leadership in emerging technology research, development, and manufacturing. Optics, photonics and imaging is one of the three industry clusters identified in “Finger Lakes Forward,” the region’s successful Upstate Revitalization Initiative blueprint to grow the economy, create jobs and drive opportunity.

“The selection of ON Semiconductor further cements the Finger Lakes’ position at the forefront of the photonics industry and as a national leader in this emerging, high-growth field,” Governor Cuomo said. “With a long history of spearheading technological innovation, Rochester is delivering on a bold vision to revitalize the regional economy and jumpstart 21st century growth. It’s clear that our strategic investments in next generation industries are paying off – delivering high-paying jobs and driving the Finger Lakes forward.”

In September 2016, Empire State Development hired an independent site selector for the TAP facility to create a more efficient process at a lower cost to taxpayers. Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, one of the world’s leading commercial real estate advisory firms, conducted a thorough review and evaluation of potential site locations based upon criteria and specifications developed in coordination with the United States Department of Defense and other key stakeholders. This independent process will save taxpayers tremendously, with at least $10 million in savings from original cost estimates pending final negotiations and approvals.

Empire State Development President, CEO & Commissioner Howard Zemsky said, “Using an independent, third party site selector allowed for the evaluation of multiple sites in the Greater Rochester region before Eastman Business Park was selected for the TAP facility. The new TAP facility will help secure the Finger Lakes leadership role in emerging technology research, development, and manufacturing and is further proof that the future shines bright for photonics in Rochester.”

The site selection process recommended ON Semiconductor, located in Building 81 at Eastman Business Park, based on its existing infrastructure, including a clean room; regional accessibility; and the fact that it had the highest “quality” score based on factors such as building functionality, operational needs and real estate terms. ON Semiconductor is also likely to meet the required project timing and has the ability to leverage significant existing building and system infrastructure. It is also located at the Eastman Business Park, which is a priority strategic site identified by the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council. An environmental review will be conducted by Empire State Development and the site is expected to be approved by the Empire State Development Board of Directors at a later date.

Bill Schromm, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer at ON Semiconductor, said, “With energy efficient semiconductor expertise across a wide range of applications, ON Semiconductor is very familiar with the semiconductor processes and facilities required for manufacturing high performance power conversion, wireless, connected, and imaging solutions. Our Rochester operations at the EBP facility incorporate the design, wafer fabrication, assembly, packaging, and testing of imaging components and we have a unique, on-site infrastructure in place, including process engineers and technicians, cleanroom facilities technicians, maintenance technicians and an HSE specialist, to help support the implementation of the TAP center. Coupling that with existing, available cleanroom space, we believe we offered a strong solution for a fast, efficient and safe enablement the TAP facility. We are honored to be selected as the site where the industry’s expertise and partnerships will come together to drive integrated photonic solutions. We also look forward to identifying additional technical and business areas to collaborate with AIM/Photonics to help grow these emerging technologies locally and attract additional businesses and talent to the area.”

New York Photonics Talks Photons with Rochester Visitor Industry Council Leaders

September 21, 2016

… and quite the crowd they are!

This is the presentation that would not run on the AV system.
For those of you that attended, let me know how I did without the digital crutch!

Thank you, Visit Rochester: Don Jeffries, Denise DeSantis-Penwright, Greg LaDuca and our Photonics Liaison, Wendy Ford.vic
And thank you to all of the other industry professionals for the warm welcome and keen interest in photonics technology!

 

>>The PDF<<

55th Annual Institute of Optics Summer Course Series

May 24, 2016

The deadline for registration is May 31st.

Note: This year there are two new courses focused upon Integrated Photonics.

Courses:

For more details and on-line registration go to >>this link<<

Moore’s Law Reaches the Stop Sign (or at least the Yield sign)

February 26, 2016

Integrated Photonics could hold the breakthrough.

Next month, the worldwide semiconductor industry will formally acknowledge what has become increasingly obvious to everyone involved: Moore’s law, the principle that has powered the information-technology revolution since the 1960s, is nearing its end.

The doubling of transistors on a given piece of silicon real estate has already started to falter, thanks to the heat that is unavoidably generated when more and more silicon circuitry is jammed into the same small area. And some even more fundamental limits loom less than a decade away. Top-of-the-line microprocessors currently have circuit features that are around 14 nanometres across, smaller than most viruses. But by the early 2020s, says Paolo Gargini, chair of the road-mapping organization, “even with super-aggressive efforts, we’ll get to the 2–3-nanometre limit, where features are just 10 atoms across. Is that a device at all?” Probably not — if only because at that scale, electron behaviour will be governed by quantum uncertainties that will make transistors hopelessly unreliable. And despite vigorous research efforts, there is no obvious successor to today’s silicon technology.

>>Read More at Nature<<

Navitar Enters Into Definitive Agreement to Acquire Hyperion Development

February 24, 2016

Rochester, New York – February 17, 2016Navitar, Inc, a leading USA-based manufacturer of precision optics and imaging system components, has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Hyperion Development, LLC, a leading design firm and manufacturer of custom optical assemblies and OEM solutions. The companies expect the deal to close by the end of the first quarter.

Navitar owners, Jeremy and Julian Goldstein comment, “We are very excited to welcome everyone at Hyperion Development into the Navitar family. This transaction brings together two industry leaders and creates an optical design powerhouse. We will be operating out of four engineering, design, and production facilities located in San Ramon, CA, Woburn, MA, Denville, NJ and Rochester, NY.” Navitar-Logo

Hyperion Development has a history of designing innovative next generation Deep Ultraviolet (DUV) and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) semiconductor lithography systems. Their optical solutions range from ultra-precision microscope objectives, high volume electronic imaging lenses, cine prime lenses, mobile medical solutions, and infrared (IR) solutions for aerospace, defense, and photonics applications.

Hyperion Development expanded in 2014 with the acquisition of AMF Optics and American Diamond Turning, LLC. The newly consolidated company, AMF Optics, LLC, is located in Woburn, MA. This state of the art, ITAR registered, ISO 9000 certified facility, will continue to provide high quality traditional diamond turned optical components and infrared lens assemblies. All personnel at each company will be maintained and current facilities will remain in place.

Michael Thomas, co-founder of Hyperion, sees this merger as an opportunity to expand Hyperion’s production capabilities thus moving their client’s products to market faster. According to Hyperion co-founder Russ Hudyma, “Navitar’s international presence and vertical integration will enable the team to reach more customers, speed up the design and prototyping process, and ensure our best in class solutions reach our customers on time and on budget.”

Jeremy Goldstein added, “The combined capabilities of Navitar and Hyperion Development just don’t exist at other optical firms around the world. Our unique abilities will continue to help our customers maintain their competitive position and help to strengthen their market leadership.”

The acquisition of Hyperion Development was a natural fit with Navitar’s long-term strategy of providing more diverse optical solutions, specifically within the UV and IR spectrum, to both current and new customers. The acquisition brings together two industry leaders with sales in over 45 countries around the world.

About Hyperion Development, LLC

Hyperion Development has proven optical solutions across the full spectrum and an extensive patent portfolio as a testimony to its world leading designs. A core competency of Hyperion is the development of Deep Ultraviolet (DUV) and Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) imaging systems for lithographic printing and semiconductor process metrology. Founders Russ Hudyma and Michael Thomas are graduates of the Institute of Optics at the University of Rochester and have been involved in the design and production of complex optical systems for over 20 years.  For more information about Hyperion Development visit their website at www.hyperion-development.com

>>WORTH NOTING<<

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Electrons are so 20th century!

November 19, 2015

What will integrated photonics look like?

In the 21st century, photonic devices, which use light to transport large amounts of information quickly, will enhance or even replace the electronic devices that are ubiquitous in our lives today. But there’s a step needed before optical connections can be integrated into telecommunications systems and computers: researchers need to make it easier to manipulate light at the nanoscale.

In this zero-index material there is no phase advance, instead it creates a constant phase, stretching out in infinitely long wavelengths. (Credit: Peter Allen, Harvard SEAS)

In this zero-index material there is no phase advance, instead it creates a constant phase, stretching out in infinitely long wavelengths. (Credit: Peter Allen, Harvard SEAS)

>>READ MORE<<