Archive for the ‘Lasers’ category

Rochester – Jena Relationship Strengthens with Visit by Thüringen Prime Minister and Delegation

May 16, 2017

Bodo Ramelow, Prime Minister of Thuringia, Germany, and a delegation of scientists and dignitaries visited Rochester on May 14 and 15. The purpose of the visit was to advance the scientific, academic research and business relationship between Rochester and Jena, two “sister cities of light.”

The ‘sister cities’ of Jena and Rochester (USA) have a lot in common: in Jena, as in Rochester, an optics industry has developed since the 19th century together with a strong supplier network. While in Jena the collaboration between Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe significantly furthered optics research, soon after in Rochester, local industrialists George Eastman (Eastman Kodak) and Edward Bausch (Bausch & Lomb) founded an optics institute at the university. In fact, Eastman visited Jena at least once in 1911, and must have recognized the city as the center of Europe’s optics industry. Since then there have been many changes. Today, both regions are enormously strong locations for the optics and photonics industry and research.

For more articles about the relationship development search here.

Andreas Tünnerman, Director, Fraunhofer IOF and Bodo Ramelow, Prime Minister of Thuringia

On Monday morning, May 15th, together with the German delegation; Rochester Museum & Science Center (RMSC) president, Kate Bennett and vice president, Dan Menelly, and RMSC board and staff, Prime Minister Ramelow and Andreas Tünnermann, Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Mechanics  donated a laser hologram to the RMSC’s permanent optics exhibit. The hologram displays the skylines of Rochester and Jena, side by side, beneath the words “We Love Photonics.”

The Fraunhofer Institute is recognized as the leading public/privately-funded organization for applied research in Europe (and the West) with an annual budget exceeding $2 billion Euro.

The color-tunable laser projected image celebrates “light-based” relationship of the two cities

The New York Photonics cluster began developing a relationship with Fraunhofer IOF in 2014, while lobbying for the National Photonics Initiative and a national institute for photonics manufacturing. The following year a team led by New York State was awarded $110 million from the Department of Defense as part of the >$620 million AIM Photonics effort for developing America’s manufacturing capacity in integrated photonics.

On Sunday night Prime Minister Ramelow hosted a dinner and reception in Rochester with faculty from University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology and Tom Battley, Executive Director of New York Photonics.

 

The delegation and attendees at the RMSC presentation ceremony, bathed in light.

Carl, the Zeiss Star Projector in the Strasenurgh Planetarium, Rochester Museum & Science Center

 

 

New York Photonics is a not-for-profit organization founded to promote and enhance the New York State optics, photonics and imaging industry by fostering the cooperation of business, academia and government.

On the Road To Ubiquity – US National Science Foundation

June 22, 2015

nsf.gov – National Science Foundation (NSF) Discoveries – On the road to ubiquity – US National Science Foundation (NSF).

As a tool, the laser has stretched the imaginations of countless scientists and engineers, making possible everything from stunning images of celestial bodies to high-speed communications. Once described as a “solution looking for a problem,” the laser powered and pulsed its way into nearly every aspect of modern life.

One area in particular, data transmission, gained momentum as the 1980s progressed. NSF’s Lightwave Technology Program in its engineering directorate was critical not only because the research it funded fueled the Internet, mobile devices and other high-bandwidth communications applications, but also because many of the laser advances in this field drove progress in other disciplines.An important example of this crossover is optical coherence tomography (OCT). Used in the late 1980s in telecommunications to find faults in miniature optical waveguides and optical fibers, this imaging technique was adapted by biomedical researchers in the early 1990s to noninvasively image microscopic structures in the eye. The imaging modality is now commonly used in ophthalmology to image the retina. NSF continues to fund OCT research.As laser technology matured through the 1990s, applications became more abundant. Lasers made their way to the factory floor (to cut, weld and drill) and the ocean floor (to boost signals in transatlantic communications). The continued miniaturization of lasers and the advent of optical fibers radically altered medical diagnostics as well as surgery.

Laser World of Photonics, Munich

June 21, 2015

“Laser Munich” begins tomorrow. The largest photonics conference in Europe. NYPhotonics is here!

IMG_6384
Adam Dunn and Jürgen Kantner in front of a statue of Joseph von Fraunhofer, the famed Bavarian and one of the fathers of modern optics.

Addressing Critical Trade Compliance Issues

June 9, 2015

On Thursday, June 4th, OSA, SPIE and New York Photonics hosted a webinar with the Department of Commerce about proposed changes to the U.S. Munitions List.  These changes have the potential to greatly hamper the export of optics and photonics products from the U.S.

26 New York Photonics members participated in the Webinar.  The presentation is >>here<<

 

 

Twisted Light Increases Efficiency of Quantum Cryptography Systems

March 24, 2015

Researchers demonstrate how to encode 2.05 bits per photon, doubling existing systems that use light polarization

graphicLeonorResearchers at the University of Rochester and their collaborators have developed a way to transfer 2.05 bits per photon by using “twisted light.” This remarkable achievement is possible because the researchers used the orbital angular momentum of the photons to encode information, rather than the more commonly used polarization of light. The new approach doubles the 1 bit per photon that is possible with current systems that rely on light polarization and could help increase the efficiency of quantum cryptography systems.

via New approach uses “twisted light” to increase the efficiency of quantum cryptography systems : NewsCenter.

Photonics NMI Competition Highlights Nation’s Industry

January 29, 2015

From the Rochester Business Journal at   http://www.rbj.net/article.asp?aID=210763

The competition that will award more than $200 million to create a manufacturing institute focused on the photonics industry will be launched soon, and Rochester is a prime candidate, officials announced Friday.

The Department of Defense will lead the competition designed to establish a photonics hub, Sen Charles Schumer, D-NY., said.

Albany also is positioned to be a hub, he said.

“Rochester is the world capital of optics and photonics and that’s why I’ve been fighting like heck for over two years to get this investment,” Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-Perinton, said in a statement.

“What the world wants most in optics and photonics is already being developed right here in Rochester. We’ve got the manufacturing facilities, the research institutions, the highly skilled workforce, and now we have the public-private investment opportunity we need to get this industry to the next level.”

A bill to create several institutes for manufacturing innovation has passed the House of Representatives and is working its way through Congress, Schumer said.

“This manufacturing institute will have a transformative impact on our local economy that will help support the thousands of jobs we already have in this industry, and potentially bring many more to Rochester,” Slaughter said in her statement.

“Our region has been leading the world in optics and photonics for decades, which is why we’re going to pursue this competition aggressively.”

Eastman Business Park, the University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology and the CNSE Smart Systems Technology & Commercialization Center in Canandaigua make the Rochester area an ideal spot, Schumer said.

“I have long been a supporter of Upstate New York’s photonics and optics industry, and have pushed to help create just this type of competition to leverage all of the expertise and technical know-how in photonics—in Rochester, Albany and cities across New York—to build on that strong foundation, create jobs and lead our nation in this cutting-edge industry,” Schumer said, in a statement.

http://www.louise.house.gov/press-releases/slaughter-announces-new-york-has-been-selected-as-a-finalist-to-compete-for-federal-photonics-institute1/

http://www.rochester.edu/newscenter/rochester-competes-for-national-photonics-institute-88132/

http://www.schumer.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/schumer-gillibrand-announce-rochester-suny-proposal-will-advance-to-final-round-of-competition-for-110-million-to-create-new-national-institute-of-photonics_senators-have-supported-effort-and-say-rochester-is-well-positioned-to-win-as-home-of-worlds-greatest-concentration-of-expertise-in-optics-photonics-imaging

Finger Lakes Regional Center Awarded $675,000

December 11, 2014

The Finger Lakes Regional Center for Advanced Optics Manufacturing was awarded $675,000 today in the New York State Regional Economic Development Competition.

Kudos to the FLREDC Optics & Photonics Committee and its chairmen, Jim Sydor of Sydor Optics and Jay Eastman of Optel for their leadership.

The money will be used to purchase two pieces of shared-use equipment, including a Zygo Infrared Interferometer and an OptiPro UltraSurf to aid the region’s optics manufacturers in developing more advanced, more competitive components for a variety of end users and markets.

With Optipro’s UltrSurf metrology instrument the local optical companies will be able to accurately measure free-form optics.

With the Zygo 3.39 micron IR interferometer will be used to measure flatness of Infrared materials such as Silicon and Germanium.

Rochester Business Journal Coverage here.