Archive for the ‘New York Photonics’ category

Sydor Instruments Receives $1 Million SBIR award from the Department of Energy, Office of Science

September 8, 2017

Grant funds the commercialization of a specialized Sydor Spectro CCD detector, designed for Soft X-ray Spectrometers.

Sydor Instruments, a Sydor Technologies Company, announced today that it has been awarded a $991,741 SBIR Phase IIA grant from the Department of Energy, Office of Science to commercialize the unique Sydor Spectro CCD. Sydor Instruments will use this grant in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The CCD includes specific features to improve resolution in soft X-ray spectroscopy. This improved resolution allows spectrometers to be shorter, which is critical for cost savings as well as achieving the high tolerance positioning when moving the spectrometer during experiments.

The Phase 1 award developed the concept and the Phase II award developed a prototype detector. The prototype detector was demonstrated in a test at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) on the RIXS beamlines 8.0.1 and 6.3.2. The Phase IIA will increase the sensor size, plus repackage the system into a commercial offering. Sydor will add this product to the suite of soft and hard X-ray detectors and beam monitors that are used globally for synchrotron and XFEL applications.

Mark Katafiaz, VP of US Operations at Sydor Technologies notes: “The SBIR support letters and strong customer demand verify that the Sydor Spectro CCD solves a significant problem. Results at ALS further confirm that our 5 micron pixel resolution, ultra low noise, and the highest ultra-soft X-ray QE will enable beamlines to fully utilize their source capabilities for years to come.”

 

Organizations Announce Economic Development Alliance for Optics, Photonics and Imaging

September 5, 2017

“No region in the nation can match our strategic advantage in optics, photonics and imaging industries,” said Thomas Battley, executive director of the New York Photonics Industry Association in a statement. “Now is the time to work together to strategically promote our region and enhance its economic growth. This partnership between GRE and New York Photonics is what is needed now. We are delighted with the prospect of undertaking a marketing effort with GRE.”

“The Greater Rochester NY region is a world leader in optics, photonics and imaging,” said Matt Hurlbutt, GRE interim president and CEO, in a statement. “GRE’s partnership with New York Photonics enhances business development efforts to leverage our region’s strengths with OPI companies across the globe. In turn, the upward trend of attracting and retaining world-class businesses will continue to climb.”

Today the region has over 120 OPI companies that employ approximately 17,000 residents in the region with $3 billion in annual sales, officials said.

The two organizations are expected to share more at the New York Photonics Annual Meeting.

>>Read More<<

Syntec Optics Solves Pioneering Challenge to Achieve 10x Growth

September 1, 2017

New renaissance framework can be used by any organization, in any field, to sustain high growth

The pioneering challenge is that it is hard to build an organization that can do both: incrementally innovate existing offerings you have now, and pioneer transformational offerings for the future. The more extreme the difference between those two creativities, the more difficult it is and you can even fail.

The Syntec Optics team has overcome the pioneering challenge. With help from its founder Al Kapoor, Syntec Optics pioneered transformational products in the defense and medical fields and now continues to provide incremental innovation to these products. Syntec Optics has built on their success and is pioneering products again for newly emerging transformational fields of the future like driverless cars, 3D printing, virtual reality, DNA editing, smart sensors, artificial intelligence and much more.

“Al has provided a renaissance framework that allows us to see the opposing demands more clearly. The framework is uniquely grounded in the fundamentals of social change, psychology, and neuroscience. It provides the ability to generate high growth,” said Syntec President Steven Polvinen.

For everyone to benefit from this framework, Al Kapoor has launched a new beta website pioneeringminds.com to follow trends and resources in fields that are headed to exponentially changing our lives. He is also releasing a new book The Pioneering Challenge. The book will be available for sale across the US in early 2018.

Catherine Whitney, who wrote the recent national bestseller with Fox News anchor Bret Baiertitled Three Days in January, is developing the manuscript with Al for The Pioneering Challenge.  Whitney said, “Al provides a new framework for everyone to understand change in society and how different human traits can be cultivated to advantageously position yourself for incremental and transformational change. The new concept of Pioneering Quotient or PQ to measure our ability to pioneer is intriguing.”

Every five to ten years an exceptional way of seeing reality emerges. “If you enjoyed the classic reads The Innovator’s Dilemma written by Harvard Business School professor Clay Christensen in 1997, Good to Great by Jim Collins in 2001, and Outliers written by New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell in 2008, you must read The Pioneering Challenge,” said Patrick Sweeney Internet entrepreneur, Olympic athlete, and Adventure film-producer.

Syntec Optics has grown to become a top ten US optics manufacturer and supplier. To learn more, sign up at pioneeringminds.com/newsletter or call Sara Hart at Syntec Optics at (585) 464-9336, x101.

IDEX ANNOUNCES ROCHESTER EXPANSION

August 15, 2017

IDEX Health & Science, LLC and Empire State Development announced that IDEX will expand its optics and photonics operations to Henrietta, Monroe County by establishing an Optical Center of Excellence. The new center will support the company’s life science, semi-conductor, and defense businesses. 

Sources say that IDEX Health & Science had considered moving its operations out of New York State. The company plans to eventually lease close to 100,000 square-feet in a newly constructed facility and will create up to 34 new full-time jobs; 186 jobs will be retained as a result of the state’s investment. The company expects to break ground on the project this fall.

“The Finger Lakes is a growing global hub for the optics, photonics and imaging industries helping to spur economic growth and create jobs across the region,” said Governor Andrew Cuomo. “With this expansion, this successful company will stay in the region, creating jobs for New Yorkers while continuing to push the Finger Lakes forward.”

 As part of the expansion project, IDEX Health & Science will install high-tech machinery and equipment in the new space and install cleanroom space on-site. The company will initially occupy 83,000 square-feet of the new build, with plans for future expansion.

Gus Salem, President, IDEX Health & Science said, “We selected the Rochester area for our new facility due to its strong history in optics technology and its base of people, universities and supporting businesses. We are pleased we can maintain our base of existing employees and business functions in the Finger Lakes Region. We are very thankful for the support of Empire State Development, New York State, and local governments that helped make this project possible.”

Empire State Development will provide up to $2.4 million through the Excelsior Jobs Program in exchange for job creation commitments.

The global photonics company specializes in fluidics and optics serving the life sciences, semiconductor, and defense markets. Product offerings include: connections, valves, pumps, degassers, column hardware, manifolds, microfluidics, consumables, integrated fluidic assemblies, filters, lenses, shutters, laser sources, light engines and integrated optical assemblies.

 For more information about IDEX Health & Science click here.

After failed deals, can SUNY Poly save itself from ‘danger’?

August 10, 2017

The most important thing for Rochester and the Finger Lakes Region is that money meant to be invested at AIM Photonics and at STC MEMS in Canandaigua is not siphoned off to pay for promises made elsewhere or for shady schemes.  We count on the primary lead investor, the DoD, to be certain that this doesn’t happen.  What else can be done?

Four years ago, Alain Kaloyeros made a pledge as he stood with state and local leaders in a former Kodak building in suburban Rochester’s Canal Ponds business park.

More than 100 new jobs were on their way to Canal Ponds as part of a new $100 million solar manufacturing facility, said Kaloyeros, then-head of SUNY’s College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering, which later merged to become SUNY Polytechnic Institute.

The next year, Kaloyeros was back with a new, bolder promise: A $500 million plant for a new power electronics consortium anchored by Sematech and IBM that would bring more than 500 jobs.

And in 2016, another pledge: Two fledgling photonics companies would partner with the state to invest $1.6 billion and create 1,400 jobs in the Rochester area, including the same Canal Ponds facility.

But they were only promises.

Today, the 57,000-sq.-ft. Canal Ponds building sits largely vacant with few, if any, jobs: a symbol of over-promising and under-delivering by Kaloyeros — now awaiting trial on fraud charges — and state leaders that still hope to use SUNY Poly’s massive Albany nanoscience complex as a model for development throughout upstate.

Source: After failed deals, can SUNY Poly save itself from ‘danger’?

New York Photonics Golf, Annual Meeting and Light & Sound Interactive

August 10, 2017

New York Photonics Annual Golf Tournament
New York Photonics Annual Meeting
Light & Sound Interactive

All in one week.  All in September.

The 2017  New York Photonics Annual Meeting
Tuesday, September 12, 2017
Annual Meeting and Panel: 3:30PM – 5:30PM
Networking Reception: 5:30PM – 7:00PM 

HYATT REGENCY ROCHESTER
Concurrent / Co-located with Light & Sound Interactive
Registration begins at 3:00PM

Speakers and Panelists

 

 

  • Bryce Tennant, Chief Technology Officer, Precision Optical Transceivers
  • Alexis Vogt, Optics Professor, Monroe Community College
  • Sujatha Ramanujan, Director, Luminate, the Photonics Start-up Competition
  • P. Scott Carney, Optics Professor & Director, UR Institute of Optics
  • Tom Battley, Executive Director, New York Photonics

Panel Discussion:
There has been a lot of great news about the Finger Lakes Optics, Photonics and Imaging Industry in the past year.  Companies are growing and business has seen steady growth.  What is the current state of our OPI ecosystem?

>>Click Here To Learn More or to Register<<

Audience:    RRPC members, Manufacturers, CEO’s and management;  economic development stakeholders; high technology entrepreneurs and service professionals; investment professionals, CPA’s, attorneys, workforce development professionals.

Agenda:
3:00 – 3:30    Sign-in
3:30 – 4:00    Introductory remarks, Annual Awards, New Board Introduction
4:00 – 5:30    Panel Discussion and audience interaction
5:30 – 7:00    Networking / refreshments


Learn more about the New York Photonics Annual Golf Tournament
Ravenwood Golf Center
Monday, September 11th.
>>Click here<<



Learn more about Light and Sound Interactive

  • Augented Reality, Virtual Reality, Gaming and the Convergence of Light and Sound
  • Innovators, Thought-leaders, Industry-Modifiers and Disruptors
  • New Modes of Multimedia and Performance
  • Hear, Participate, Observe or Blur the Boundaries

 >>Click Here<<


 

RIT Sensing technology takes a quantum leap with photonics research

August 9, 2017

Rochester Institute of Technology researcher leading a three-year study on precision quantum sensing funded by a $550,000 grant from the U.S. Department of the Navy’s Office of Naval Research, officials announced Wednesday.

Research underway at RIT advances a new kind of sensing technology that captures data with better precision than currently possible and promises cheaper, smaller and lighter sensor designs.Mishkat Bhattacharya, a theoretical physicist at RIT, is investigating new precision quantum sensing solutions for the U.S. Department of the Navy’s Office of Naval Research.

The three-year study is supported by $550,000 grant and is a continuation of a previous award. Bhattacharya will test interactions between light and matter at the nanoscale and analyze measurements of weak electromagnetic fields and gravitational forces.Specialized microscopes measure theoretical predictions that describe matter at the nanoscale in which a nanometer equals one-billionth of a meter and a human hair measures between 80,000-100,000 nanometers, according to the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative.

Levitated optomechanics can make a nanoparticle float in space

It’s no trick of the eye; it’s an optical trap.

Levitated optomechanics can make a nanoparticle float in space. A finely focused laser beam forms an “optical tweezer” and creates a tiny, isolated laboratory for the study of delicate quantum states. RIT scientist Mishkat Bhattacharya tests his theoretical predictions on such experimental platforms used by his collaborator Nick Vamivakas at the University of Rochester’s Institute of Optics. (Image: J. Adam Fenster and Prof. A. N. Vamivakas, University of Rochester)Bhattacharya works in the emerging field of levitated optomechanics, an area of physics that investigates nanoparticles by trapping them in a laser beam.

Laser trapping–a method known as “optical tweezers”–tests the limits of quantum effects in isolation and eliminates physical disturbances from the surrounding environmentUsing the techniques of laser trapping, Bhattacharya takes quantum mechanics to the next level by probing quantum effects in the nanoparticles, which contain billions of atoms. He investigates where quantum mechanics (which governs the microscopic) butts up against classical physics (which explains the macroscopic) and explores light-matter interaction in macroscopic quantum physics.

“Levitated optomechanical systems provide a clean platform for studying quantum optics, information science, and precision measurement and sensing,” said Bhattacharya, an associate professor in RIT’s School of Physics and Astronomy and a member of the Future Photon Initiative.To explore different nanosystems for the Office of Naval Research, Bhattacharya isolates a nanodiamond in a pocket of light. Suspension in laser light turns the particle into a floating probe. Bhattacharya is interested in the signatures carried in the light and the information it reveals about the electromagnetic fields and the gravitational forces surrounding the nanoparticle.He collaborates with postdoctoral associate Pardeep Kumar and RIT undergraduate physics major Wyatt Wetzel. This summer, a visiting undergraduate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Peter Mizes, joined his Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Theory Group. Bhattacharya tests his theoretical predictions in a lab run by his collaborator Nick Vamivakas, an experimental physicist at the University of Rochester’s Institute of Optics.His first study for the Office of Naval Research determined the smallest force that could be detected with a diamond crystal that levitated without spinning. The new project investigates the outcomes of three nanosystems, each using nanoparticles optically trapped under different conditions:

  • A particle containing an impurity which acts as a spin sensitive to magnetic fields or as an excess charge sensitive to electric fields;
  • A particle moving like a pendulum in three dimensions;
  • A particle larger than the wavelength of light entrapping it.

Quantum mechanics is a door to a world on the nanoscale and is governed by a different set of physical laws.”Unique rules apply in quantum physics,” Bhattacharya said. “It is not the day-to-day physical universe familiar to our experience.”Optomechanics explores interactions between light and tiny particles of matter within the nano-realm. Sensing technology advanced at these submicroscopic scale promises finer measurements of physical properties that describe the world, such as electric and magnetic fields, temperature, force, velocity, acceleration, gravitation.According to Bhattacharya, quantum sensors might someday detect gravitational waves, find dark matter, perfect quantum computing and create precise accelerometers–the technology that rights display screens held at any angle.

Read more: Sensing technology takes a quantum leap with photonics research A

 

“”Quantum sensing” describes the use of a quantum system, quantum properties or quantum phenomena to perform a measurement of a physical quantity. Historical examples of quantum sensors include magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices and atomic vapors, or atomic clocks. More recently, quantum sensing has become a distinct and rapidly growing branch of research within the area of quantum science and technology, with the most common platforms being spin qubits, trapped ions and flux qubits. The field is expected to provide new opportunities – especially with regard to high sensitivity and precision – in applied physics and other areas of science”