Archive for the ‘Optics’ category

Syntec Optics Solves Pioneering Challenge to Achieve 10x Growth

September 1, 2017

New renaissance framework can be used by any organization, in any field, to sustain high growth

The pioneering challenge is that it is hard to build an organization that can do both: incrementally innovate existing offerings you have now, and pioneer transformational offerings for the future. The more extreme the difference between those two creativities, the more difficult it is and you can even fail.

The Syntec Optics team has overcome the pioneering challenge. With help from its founder Al Kapoor, Syntec Optics pioneered transformational products in the defense and medical fields and now continues to provide incremental innovation to these products. Syntec Optics has built on their success and is pioneering products again for newly emerging transformational fields of the future like driverless cars, 3D printing, virtual reality, DNA editing, smart sensors, artificial intelligence and much more.

“Al has provided a renaissance framework that allows us to see the opposing demands more clearly. The framework is uniquely grounded in the fundamentals of social change, psychology, and neuroscience. It provides the ability to generate high growth,” said Syntec President Steven Polvinen.

For everyone to benefit from this framework, Al Kapoor has launched a new beta website pioneeringminds.com to follow trends and resources in fields that are headed to exponentially changing our lives. He is also releasing a new book The Pioneering Challenge. The book will be available for sale across the US in early 2018.

Catherine Whitney, who wrote the recent national bestseller with Fox News anchor Bret Baiertitled Three Days in January, is developing the manuscript with Al for The Pioneering Challenge.  Whitney said, “Al provides a new framework for everyone to understand change in society and how different human traits can be cultivated to advantageously position yourself for incremental and transformational change. The new concept of Pioneering Quotient or PQ to measure our ability to pioneer is intriguing.”

Every five to ten years an exceptional way of seeing reality emerges. “If you enjoyed the classic reads The Innovator’s Dilemma written by Harvard Business School professor Clay Christensen in 1997, Good to Great by Jim Collins in 2001, and Outliers written by New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell in 2008, you must read The Pioneering Challenge,” said Patrick Sweeney Internet entrepreneur, Olympic athlete, and Adventure film-producer.

Syntec Optics has grown to become a top ten US optics manufacturer and supplier. To learn more, sign up at pioneeringminds.com/newsletter or call Sara Hart at Syntec Optics at (585) 464-9336, x101.

RIT Sensing technology takes a quantum leap with photonics research

August 9, 2017

Rochester Institute of Technology researcher leading a three-year study on precision quantum sensing funded by a $550,000 grant from the U.S. Department of the Navy’s Office of Naval Research, officials announced Wednesday.

Research underway at RIT advances a new kind of sensing technology that captures data with better precision than currently possible and promises cheaper, smaller and lighter sensor designs.Mishkat Bhattacharya, a theoretical physicist at RIT, is investigating new precision quantum sensing solutions for the U.S. Department of the Navy’s Office of Naval Research.

The three-year study is supported by $550,000 grant and is a continuation of a previous award. Bhattacharya will test interactions between light and matter at the nanoscale and analyze measurements of weak electromagnetic fields and gravitational forces.Specialized microscopes measure theoretical predictions that describe matter at the nanoscale in which a nanometer equals one-billionth of a meter and a human hair measures between 80,000-100,000 nanometers, according to the U.S. National Nanotechnology Initiative.

Levitated optomechanics can make a nanoparticle float in space

It’s no trick of the eye; it’s an optical trap.

Levitated optomechanics can make a nanoparticle float in space. A finely focused laser beam forms an “optical tweezer” and creates a tiny, isolated laboratory for the study of delicate quantum states. RIT scientist Mishkat Bhattacharya tests his theoretical predictions on such experimental platforms used by his collaborator Nick Vamivakas at the University of Rochester’s Institute of Optics. (Image: J. Adam Fenster and Prof. A. N. Vamivakas, University of Rochester)Bhattacharya works in the emerging field of levitated optomechanics, an area of physics that investigates nanoparticles by trapping them in a laser beam.

Laser trapping–a method known as “optical tweezers”–tests the limits of quantum effects in isolation and eliminates physical disturbances from the surrounding environmentUsing the techniques of laser trapping, Bhattacharya takes quantum mechanics to the next level by probing quantum effects in the nanoparticles, which contain billions of atoms. He investigates where quantum mechanics (which governs the microscopic) butts up against classical physics (which explains the macroscopic) and explores light-matter interaction in macroscopic quantum physics.

“Levitated optomechanical systems provide a clean platform for studying quantum optics, information science, and precision measurement and sensing,” said Bhattacharya, an associate professor in RIT’s School of Physics and Astronomy and a member of the Future Photon Initiative.To explore different nanosystems for the Office of Naval Research, Bhattacharya isolates a nanodiamond in a pocket of light. Suspension in laser light turns the particle into a floating probe. Bhattacharya is interested in the signatures carried in the light and the information it reveals about the electromagnetic fields and the gravitational forces surrounding the nanoparticle.He collaborates with postdoctoral associate Pardeep Kumar and RIT undergraduate physics major Wyatt Wetzel. This summer, a visiting undergraduate from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Peter Mizes, joined his Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics Theory Group. Bhattacharya tests his theoretical predictions in a lab run by his collaborator Nick Vamivakas, an experimental physicist at the University of Rochester’s Institute of Optics.His first study for the Office of Naval Research determined the smallest force that could be detected with a diamond crystal that levitated without spinning. The new project investigates the outcomes of three nanosystems, each using nanoparticles optically trapped under different conditions:

  • A particle containing an impurity which acts as a spin sensitive to magnetic fields or as an excess charge sensitive to electric fields;
  • A particle moving like a pendulum in three dimensions;
  • A particle larger than the wavelength of light entrapping it.

Quantum mechanics is a door to a world on the nanoscale and is governed by a different set of physical laws.”Unique rules apply in quantum physics,” Bhattacharya said. “It is not the day-to-day physical universe familiar to our experience.”Optomechanics explores interactions between light and tiny particles of matter within the nano-realm. Sensing technology advanced at these submicroscopic scale promises finer measurements of physical properties that describe the world, such as electric and magnetic fields, temperature, force, velocity, acceleration, gravitation.According to Bhattacharya, quantum sensors might someday detect gravitational waves, find dark matter, perfect quantum computing and create precise accelerometers–the technology that rights display screens held at any angle.

Read more: Sensing technology takes a quantum leap with photonics research A

 

“”Quantum sensing” describes the use of a quantum system, quantum properties or quantum phenomena to perform a measurement of a physical quantity. Historical examples of quantum sensors include magnetometers based on superconducting quantum interference devices and atomic vapors, or atomic clocks. More recently, quantum sensing has become a distinct and rapidly growing branch of research within the area of quantum science and technology, with the most common platforms being spin qubits, trapped ions and flux qubits. The field is expected to provide new opportunities – especially with regard to high sensitivity and precision – in applied physics and other areas of science”

Governor Cuomo Announces Luminate Now Accepting Applications

August 7, 2017

Luminate: The World’s Largest Start-up Accelerator for Optics, Photonics and Imaging Technologies

  • Sujatha Ramanujan named Managing Director
  • Advisory Board of Industry Leaders Named
  • “Finger Lakes Forward” Investment Advances the Region’s Successful Strategic Plan to Grow the Economy and Create New Opportunities

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced that the application window is open for Luminate NY, the world’s largest business accelerator for startup firms in the optics, photonics and imaging industries, in Rochester. The Luminate NY initiative, which is being administered by High Tech Rochester, is focused on attracting and growing the most promising optics and photonics companies from across the state, the nation, and around the globe. Funding for the $10 million program is being provided through the Finger Lakes Forward Upstate Revitalization Initiative award.

“New York’s strategic investments have positioned Rochester as a global leader in the photonics industry, and through this innovative program, I look forward to supporting the growth of new businesses across the region,” Governor Cuomo said. “By fostering innovation and supporting the growth of new photonics companies, Luminate NY is leveraging the region’s strong economy to continue to move the Finger Lakes forward.”

Applications are now being accepted through September 15 on a rolling acceptance basis. Teams are encouraged to submit applications as early as possible for the best chance of being chosen for the program. Luminate NY applications are available here.

Luminate NY is looking for entrepreneurs interested in solving challenging optics, photonics and imaging problems, including but not limited to: machine vision, inspection, biophotonics, security, surveillance, augmented and virtual reality, and autonomous vehicles. Teams will be competing for one of ten available slots in the first cohort, guaranteeing them a minimum investment of $100,000 and major investments of up to $1 million.

Luminate NY applicants must be incorporated, have a full-time team and should have proven their core technology, preferably having developed a working prototype. Once admitted, companies will receive assistance with capital and a community of resources. Each member will receive a $100,000 initial convertible note investment, with a chance for follow-on funding at the end of the rigorous six month entrepreneurship training program, expected to total $2 million.

Jim Senall, High Tech Rochester President said, “Since announcing this new program just a short while ago, we are amazed by the amount of interest from the industry. We now have a world-class national advisory board in place, and a new Managing Director hired to run the program. We now really look forward to reviewing program applications and selecting our first cohort of teams.”

Additionally, Dr. Sujatha Ramanujan has been hired to serve as Managing Director for the Luminate NY initiative, following a national search for the position. A serial entrepreneur and seasoned executive with 25 years of experience in Clinical Devices and in Consumer Electronics, Dr. Ramanujan has established, developed and grown three start-up businesses in cardiac surgical equipment, optical communications and nano materials. Dr. Ramanujan also holds 28 issued US patents. As a corporate investor for Kodak, Dr. Ramanujan provides guidance to start-ups, M&A strategies for growing businesses, and vetting of technologies to investors. She has also served on investment advisories in the U.S., Canada and Israel.

The Luminate NY Advisory Board is comprised of a who’s who of optics, photonics and imaging industry leaders.  Nearly every one of these people have been speakers at the New York Photonics Annual Meeting in the past ten years as New York Photonics has spearheaded the promotion of the region’s OPI Industry:

  • Eugene Arthurs – CEO SPIE
  • Milton Chang – Managing Director, Incubic Management
  • Stuart Elby – SVP, Data Center Business Group, Infinera
  • Steve Fantone – Founder & President, Optikos Corporation
  • Mike Foley – Managing Director, Artemis Capital Partners, L.P.
  • Don Golini – Founder, QED Technologies
  • Jay Kumler – President, Jenoptik Optical Systems
  • Michael Liehr – CEO AIM Photonics
  • Duncan Moore – Vice Provost for Entrepreneurship at University of Rochester           
  • Ryne Raffaelle – Vice President for Research and Associate Provost at Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Darius Sankey – General Partner, Sway Ventures
  • Jim Senall – President, High Tech Rochester

Empire State Development President, CEO & Commissioner Howard Zemsky said, “The Luminate NY accelerator initiative is already attracting innovative optics, photonics and imaging industry leaders and entrepreneurs. By providing them with the support needed to harness their pioneering ideas, we are helping the Finger Lakes region move forward.”

>>Read More Here<<

Two years after VP Biden visit, what’s the state of photonics? | WHEC.com

August 4, 2017

Two years ago, former Vice President Joe Biden came to Rochester to announce the start of AIM Photonics.

WHEC TV in Rochester wanted to know: what has happened since?

There are two different things here. The thing the Vice President talked about was AIM Photonics. That is the federally-funded research and development group that is trying to invent photonic circuit boards so that photons power everything in the world.

I couldn’t find their office here.

On the other hand I found people in the private sector and their job is photonics.

Just Google AIM Photonics. The website shows the old Kodak R&D building on Lake Avenue. So today that’s where I went. I asked reception if I could get to the AIM Photonics office. The building receptionist told me they’re not here yet.

“They’re not here yet,” I responded. “Okay.”

But then I met Filipp Ignatovich.

>>READ MORE<<

LaserMax (Rochester, NY), acquired by Crosman (Rochester, NY), joins larger corporate structure

July 28, 2017

Crosman acquired laser sight company LaserMax a couple weeks after the airgun and optics manufacturer was acquired by a Connecticut capital investment company.

The chain of events kicked off July 5 when Compass Diversified Holdings completed the purchase of Crosman for $152 million using both cash and credit, according to public filings of the transaction. Then, Crosman acquired LaserMax on July 20 for an unspecified sum using Compass’s revolving credit line.

Compass chief executive officer, Alan Offenberg, explained “this premium laser sight brand” would allow Crosman to reach a wider customer base in the outdoor recreation market.

“The addition of LaserMax’s Commercial business supports Crosman’s strategic initiative of expanding into attractive adjacent markets and realizing cross-selling opportunities with current big box retail and international customers,” Offenberg said in a statement.

Source: LaserMax, acquired by Crosman, joins larger corporate structure

Luminate – Accelerating Optics, Photonics, and Imaging Enabled Startups

July 5, 2017

Excited to be working with our partners at High Technology of Rochester (HTR) on developing the biggest Optics. Photonics and Imaging start-up development programs in the country!  This has been a long time coming, and we are glad to have finally achieved the recognition!

Luminate:  Helping optics photonics and imaging enabled startups with investment, mentors, and by providing access to a community of optics, photonics and imaging companies in Rochester, NY.

Source: Luminate – Accelerating optics, photonics, and imaging enabled startups

Microsoft Hololens Hologram AR Projection Technology

June 19, 2017

Blending real-world and virtual content to create compelling interactive experiences.
Hardware and software platforms to get there.

 

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/hololens