Archive for the ‘Research’ category

New Partnership Between the Optics Regions Rochester and Jena

September 12, 2016

The ‘sister cities’ of Jena and Rochester (USA) have a lot in common: Here, as there, an optics industry has developed since the 19th century together with suppliers. While in Jena the collaboration between Carl Zeiss and Ernst Abbe significantly furthered optics research, soon after in Rochester, local industrialists George Eastman (Eastman Kodak) and Edward Bausch (Bausch & Lomb) founded an optics institute at the university. Since then there have been many changes. Today, both regions are enormously strong locations for the optics and photonics industry and research.

The University of Rochester and Friedrich Schiller University Jen sign a Memorandum of Understanding for the ERASMUS program. The event was held in the Welles-Brown Room of Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester's River Campus, Rochester, NY, Monday, September 12, 2016. In the front row from left to right: Andrew Berger, Jane Gatewood, Wendi Heinzelman, Walter Rosenthal, Claudia Hillinger, and Tom Brown. In the rear from left to right: Kevin Füchsel and Andreas Tünnermann.

The University of Rochester and Friedrich Schiller University Jena sign a Memorandum of Understanding for the ERASMUS program. The event was held in the Welles-Brown Room of Rush Rhees Library on the University of Rochester’s River Campus, Rochester, NY, Monday, September 12, 2016. In the front row from left to right: Andrew Berger, Jane Gatewood, Wendi Heinzelman, Walter Rosenthal, Claudia Hillinger, and Tom Brown. In the rear from left to right: Kevin Füchsel and Andreas Tünnermann.

Source: New partnership between the optics region Rochester and Jena – Fraunhofer IOF

CNSE Achieves Business-funded Research Distinction

February 10, 2015

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering in Albany was No.1 in the country for research expenditures funded by business in fiscal year 2013.
That’s according to a report out last week from the National Science Foundation.

The nanocollege received $201.6 million in research and development expenditures from business, a piece of the college’s $374.2 million in total research expenditures for 2013. About 53.9 percent of the research expenditures at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering were funded by businesses, compared with the national average of 5.2 percent.

[Nanocollege: is that a really small college?]

Read more…

RIT scientists investigating ‘sprayable’ telescope lenses

December 9, 2014

Telescope lenses someday might come in aerosol cans.

Scientists at Rochester Institute of Technology and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory are exploring a new type of space telescope with an aperture made of swarms of particles released from a canister and controlled by a laser.

RIT Associate Professor Grover Swartzlander is the co-investigator on the "orbiting rainbows" project.

RIT Associate Professor Grover Swartzlander is the co-investigator on the “orbiting rainbows” project.

These floating lenses would be larger, cheaper and lighter than apertures on conventional space-based imaging systems like NASA’s Hubble and James Webb space telescopes, said Grover Swartzlander, associate professor at RIT’s Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science and Fellow of the Optical Society of America. Swartzlander is a co-investigator on the Jet Propulsion team led by Marco Quadrelli.

NASA’s Innovative Advanced Concepts Program is funding the second phase of the “orbiting rainbows” project that attempts to combine space optics and “smart dust,” or autonomous robotic system technology. The smart dust is made of a photo-polymer, or a light-sensitive plastic, covered with a metallic coating.

“Our motivation is to make a very large aperture telescope in space and that’s typically very expensive and difficult to do,” Swartzlander said. “You don’t have to have one continuous mass telescope in order to do astronomy—it can be distributed over a wide distance. Our proposed concept could be a very cheap, easy way to achieve large coverage, something you couldn’t do with the James Webb-type of approach.”

More: http://www.engineering.com/DesignerEdge/DesignerEdgeArticles/ArticleID/9098/Sprayable-Telescope-Lenses.aspx