Archive for the ‘RRPC Member News’ category

Sydor Instruments Receives Grants from the Department of Energy, Office of Science

April 18, 2017

A $225,000 SBIR Phase I grant provides for the commercialization of a unique X-ray detector operating in the soft X-ray regime at 100 times faster than current commercial offerings.

Sydor Instruments, a Sydor Technologies Company, announced today that is has been awarded a $225,000 SBIR Phase I grant from the Department of Energy, Office of Science. Sydor Instruments will use this grant in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to commercialize a unique CCD sensor, the Sydor Fast CCD, that allows for direct detection of EUV to tender X-rays at speeds 100 times faster than traditional offerings. X-ray light sources have continued to develop brighter and faster X-ray beams that can exploit new information from their experiments, as long as they have detectors that can resolve the details. The Sydor Fast CCD is specifically designed to allow new discovery for experimental methods like scattering and diffraction, as well as directed research into areas such as, semiconductors and nanomaterials.

The Phase 1 award allows Sydor Instruments to execute the transfer of a proven, installed R&D sensor into a repackaged and enhanced commercial offering that addresses the requirements demanded by the worldwide light source community.


The company also announced that it has received a $223,861 STTR Phase I grant from DOEOS for the commercialization of an ultra-wide dynamic range detector to address the extreme conditions powerful light sources provide.  

Sydor Instruments will use this grant in collaboration with Cornell University to commercialize an ultra-wide dynamic range X-ray detector, the Sydor MM-PAD. Traditional X-ray detectors cannot accommodate the large dynamic range of collected X-rays. When a detector is out of the required dynamic range, fundamental scientific questions go unanswered or the beam line must employ multiple tests, multiple sensors and the additionally complicated analysis.  The Sydor MM-PAD also solves the tradeoff between dynamic range versus resolution by employing a mixed mode analog/digital capability that maintains the single X-ray sensitivity in the analog mode and extends the dynamic range by utilizing an in-pixel digital overflow counter.

Mark Katafiaz, Vice President of US Operations, commented, “Sydor is pleased to be chosen again by the DOE for commercialization of another of the Cornell PAD sensors, the MM-PAD. Our projects with the Cornell detector group continue to address the needs of worldwide scientists and state-of-the-art light source requirements. We are proud to leverage our two New York State entities that are delivering new capabilities to the worldwide science community.”

 

OptiPro Systems Receives 2016 Tibbetts Award from the U.S. Small Business Administration

January 26, 2017

 High-tech manufacturing company recognized for achievements in the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) program

OptiPro Systems, LLC, a world leader in precision optics optipro_3d-no-tagline-copymanufacturing equipment, was honored with the 2016 Tibbetts Award for their achievements in innovation and job creation as a participant in the SBIR program. The company credits the program to helping develop solutions for cost-effective manufacturing of optical components with defense and commercial applications. OptiPro was one of 37 U.S. companies to receive this prestigious award during a White House ceremony on January 10th.Named in honor of the late Roland Tibbetts, the acknowledged father of the SBIR program, the esteemed Tibbetts Awards recognize those individuals, organizations, firms or projects that made a visible technological impact on the socio-economic front and exemplify the very best in SBIR achievements.

“It is truly an honor to be a recipient of the 2016 Tibbetts Award. Without the SBIR program, OptiPro would not have been able to make the R&D investments necessary to grow our company and advance our technology to where it is today,” said Mike Bechtold, President of OptiPro. “Our continued success with the SBIR programs will help us to create the best possible advanced manufacturing solutions, especially for our important U.S. based precision optics and ceramic producing companies.”  

 Since receiving their first SBIR grant, OptiPro has grown from less than 15 employees to more than 80 today. The company hosts a semi-annual SBIR review conference which highlights the technical advancements being made by OptiPro as well as other small companies participating in the SBIR program. Through the SBIR program, OptiPro has developed new machines and processes which are commercialized in sales to Prime contractors, small to medium sized optics manufacturers, and exported around the world. All profits earned since receiving their first SBIR grant have been re-invested in the company to increase technological improvement and commercialization of technologies.

>>more about OptiPro<<

East High School Precision Optics Manufacturing Lab: Coating Chamber Functional!

December 22, 2016

The East High Optical Fabrication laboratory recently added coating capabilities with a Denton DV-502A coating chamber.14095696_1755989041351249_5795386981671000285_n

Patrick Iulianello,Vice President Operations at Accucoat (Rochester, NY) recently helped East High Precision Optics Manufacturing students with their first aluminum mirror coating efforts on 2″ plano discs (made in the lab).  Accucoat also helped with some custom tooling for the chamber.

Next up: copper coating!

East High School is the only high school in the country with a precision optical manufacturing lab.
The comprehensive laboratory at East High School is the envy of colleges and universities.accucoat-logo
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New Scale Technologies Micro-positioner Has Applications in Retinal Microsurgery, Robotic End-of-arm Tooling, other applications

April 14, 2016

Tiny Micro-positioner Has Applications in Retinal Microsurgery, Robotic End-of-arm Tooling, MEMS and photonics micro-manufacturing, and fiber positioning and alignment

New Scale Technologies, Inc. (www.newscaletech.com) is developing the world’s smallest commercial hexapod under a Phase 1 Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant. Awarded by the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the grant funds development of a clinically-compatible, six-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) hand-held micromanipulator for hand tremor cancellation in microsurgical systems.

A prototype micromanipulator was developed the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University with New Scale contributions. At less than 25 mm in diameter, it was the first hexapod or Gough-Stewart platform small enough for use in a hand-held instrument.

 New Scale is using the SBIR grant to develop an improved hexapod system with the same small size as the prototype, preparing the way for a clinically-compatible product ready for commercialization. Specific aims include improved dynamic performance, higher precision, and integration of a microcontroller with local feedback and motion control. Additionally, New Scale will evaluate the feasibility of a future wireless instrument with MEMS inertial sensors, on-board batteries and wireless communication.

 The hexapod system incorporates six piezoelectric SQUIGGLE® micro motors, miniature bearing assemblies, motor mounts, flexures, spring preloads and miniature drive electronics.

 In the handheld surgical tool, CMU algorithms enable the hexapod system to track its own motion, filter the undesired motion component, and deflect the tool tip with equal and opposite motion to reduce tremor amplitude. The CMU research was published in IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, Volume 20, Issue 2, by Yang, MacLachlan and Riviere.

 With its unprecedented small size and submicron precision, a commercialized version of the miniature hexapod has utility beyond microsurgery. Applications include use as a robotic end-effector for testing and manufacture of MEMS and photonics accessories, and positioning and alignment of collimated fibers or assemblies.NewScale-hexapod-SBIR-PRsmall

 

M3 “micro-mechatronic module” platform delivers key benefits

 The micro hexapod positioner builds on New Scale’s M3 “micro-mechatronic module” development platform, enabling the smallest, highest resolution, most repeatable closed-loop positioning solutions available. Each M3 smart module integrates New Scale’s patented and proprietary SQUIGGLE® or UTAF™ piezoelectric motors, drive electronics, position sensors, micro mechanical guides and control technologies. These “all in-one” smart modules plug-and-play directly with an embedded processor and provide the fastest time to market with the lowest total cost.

G-S PLASTIC OPTICS CEO Cited as Urban Innovator

December 3, 2015
andy

Andy Germanow

“[Andy Germanow is]…like his father and his grandfather were before him, in the manufacturing business. G-S Plastic Optics makes precision components for medical devices, and his metal working operation Tel-Tru makes thermometers and pressure gauges. The other finalists for the Reshaping Rochester 2015 Robert Macon Award turned old buildings into lofts and a hotel, or built new apartments and retail space. The 115-year-old building at 408 St. Paul St. is, as it was, a manufacturing center.”

>>Read More Here<<

G-S

Germanow Simon in earlier days

2015 New York Photonics Awards Presented at Annual Meeting

September 25, 2015

 

ROCHESTER, NY, September 17th. 2015 – The Rochester Regional Photonics Cluster/New York Photonics (RRPC) today honored three leaders in education and business for their contributions to New York’s Optics and Photonics Industry.

RRPC Executive Director Tom Battley joined past years’ award winners to present the awards in front of more than 300 representatives from industry, government and education from across the region at the New York Photonics 2015 Annual Meeting held in the Rochester Museum and Science Center.


BickslerThe RRPC Entrepreneur Award
is given each year to an individual for demonstrating creativity, innovative spirit and drive in pursuit of the dream of creating an industry-leading company in the Optics, Photonics and Imaging Industry. The Entrepreneur Award recipient for 2015 is Bob Bicksler, CEO of JML Optical Industries in East Rochester, NY.

Bicksler has served as the President and CEO of JML Optical Industries since the 2011 change of ownership. He is responsible for developing the company’s strategy and has led numerous initiatives to position JML as a leader in the optics industry. Prior to acquiring JML with several partners, Bob served as the President and CEO of a leading provider of software products and services for the mobile device market. Bob has over 30 years of operational and financial background in manufacturing, technology, and telecommunications companies. His track record is one of continued success in growing companies and delivering superior products to a wide range of customers.

Bob is a Lecturer (part-time) of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is also an active instructor at North Carolina School of Science and Math (NCSSM), part of the UNC system. NCSSM is the world’s first public, residential high school for juniors and seniors that provides a specialized curriculum in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math. Bob holds degrees from The Pennsylvania State University (BS, Business Administration) and The University of North Texas (MS).

 

DuncanMoorePhotoThe RRPC Leadership Award is given each year to an individual for working with RRPC members and the community to promote the Rochester Region’s Optics, Photonics and Imaging Industry. The Leadership Award recipient for 2015 is Dr. Duncan Moore.

Moore is the Rudolf and Hilda Kingslake Professor of Optical Engineering, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Business Administration at the University of Rochester. In 2007, he was also appointed Vice Provost for Entrepreneurship at the University. In this role, he manages the Kauffman Campus Initiative ($10.6M over 5 years). From 1995 to 1997, Dr. Moore was Dean of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University, and in 1996 he also served as President of the Optical Society of America. The U.S. Senate confirmed Dr. Moore in the fall of 1997 as Associate Director for Technology in The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). In this position, which ended December 2000, he worked with Dr. Neal Lane, President Clinton’s Science Advisor, to advise the President on U.S. technology policy.

Moore has extensive experience in the academic, research, business, and governmental arenas of science and technology. He is an expert in gradient index optics, solar cell design, computer-aided design, and the manufacture of optical systems. In 1993, Dr. Moore began a one-year appointment as Science Advisor to Senator John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia. He also chaired the successful Hubble Independent Optical Review Panel organized in 1990 to determine the correct prescription of the Hubble Space Telescope. He currently chairs the Product-Integrity-Team for the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. He is also the founder and former president of Gradient Lens Corporation of Rochester, NY, a company that manufactures the Hawkeye boroscope. He holds Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in optics from the University of Rochester, and a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Maine. Dr. Moore was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in February 1998, and in 2006 Moore received the Gold Medal of The International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). Dr. Moore was the recipient of the 2009 Edwin H. Land Medal presented by the Society for Imaging Science and Technology and the Optical Society of America.

Conrow2The RRPC Education Award is given each year to an individual for inspiring students to embrace Optics, Photonics, and Imaging sciences and guiding them in career development. The Education Award recipient for 2015 is East High School Science Teacher Paul Conrow.

Conrow initiated and developed the East High School Optics Manufacturing Lab (Rochester, NY) that includes a complete shop for manufacturing precision optics.  He was the initiator, with New York Photonics Executive Director and a team of volunteers, of the Optics Summer Sizzler, a summer immersion program for teaching students and teachers about optics and photonics.

Conrow helped run a summer physics research program for area high school students, under the direction of Professor Kevin McFarland at the University of Rochester. This paid experience for students required them to refurbish, test, and experiment with several 3’ x 10’ solid scintillating panels.  He has worked with students to perform cosmic ray experiments with scintillating panels on the university campus. The final destination for the panels is FermiLab in Batavia, Illinois as part of a multi-year neutrino experiment that began in 2009.

Another Patent for Lumetrics

August 4, 2015

Lumetrics receives patent for system that combines wavefront analysis and dimensional measurement.

Rochester, NY (PRWEB) May 15, 2015

Lumetrics was awarded a patent for an apparatus that measures the optical performance characteristics and dimensions of an optical element using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and a low coherence interferometer. This is a major improvement on current manufacturing inspection methods, especially for the contact lens and intraocular lens industries.

The first implementation of this product uses a modified ClearWave in combination with our industry leading OptiGauge® thickness measurement system. This provides contact lens manufacturers center thickness (CT), Sagittal Height (SAG), diameter, radius of curvature, and all the wavefront measurements that currently require two separate systems to obtain. “This not only provides for a drastically reduced equipment footprint, but also reduces the required operator handling,” said Lumetrics President John Hart. “Any time our customers can reduce operator handling, they reduce the potential problems that can occur with handling.”

Additional benefits include the ability to precisely measure the distance from the back of the lens relative to the object plane of the ClearWave. This ensures the ability of the operator to achieve the most accurate power measurements.

Lumetrics places a high value on its intellectual property. In addition to this latest patent, Lumetrics also owns or controls over 30 patents and a dozen software copyrights. “Our IP is a core strength we bring to our customers, and we protect it vigorously,” said Hart.