Posted tagged ‘RochesterRRPC’

2017 New York Photonics Map/Calendar Debuts at SPIE Photonics West

February 10, 2017

It’s popular!  It has already gone global!
We handed out nearly 250 calendars, large and small,  at the New York Photonics booth in the Photonics West New York Aisle this year.
Industry folks and customers around the world love to get their hands on this calendar.
Thank you to all of the sponsors for their support of this great economic development handout.

If you live in the Finger Lakes Region you can get your hands on the calendars at local events.
If you live elsewhere you may be able to get one from one of our many sponsors or at international SPIE and OSA conferences.

new-york-photonics-17

Optics & Photonics Investments Will Continue To Spur Regional Economic Growth

April 1, 2016

In August, Vice President Joe Biden, U.S. Rep. Louise Slaughter and Gov. Andrew Cuomo designated Rochester as headquarters for a $650 million integrated photonics startup, AIM Photonics. The intent of the institute is to design and build computer chips that use light (photons), rather than electronics (electrons), wherever possible. The technology has broad transformational potential across all industries and positions our state and city as potential big winners in this high-stakes effort, with new companies and new engineering and manufacturing jobs.

The Finger Lakes region also won one of New York’s coveted Upstate Revitalization Initiative awards of $500 million over five years, with optics and photonics a key economic pillar. This separate award holds extraordinary potential for our region, and for New York.

The members of New York Photonics approach this responsibility seriously. A transformational project of the sort that will leverage our technical, educational and intellectual resources takes time to cultivate.

>Read More Here<<

 

2015 New York Photonics Awards Presented at Annual Meeting

September 25, 2015

 

ROCHESTER, NY, September 17th. 2015 – The Rochester Regional Photonics Cluster/New York Photonics (RRPC) today honored three leaders in education and business for their contributions to New York’s Optics and Photonics Industry.

RRPC Executive Director Tom Battley joined past years’ award winners to present the awards in front of more than 300 representatives from industry, government and education from across the region at the New York Photonics 2015 Annual Meeting held in the Rochester Museum and Science Center.


BickslerThe RRPC Entrepreneur Award
is given each year to an individual for demonstrating creativity, innovative spirit and drive in pursuit of the dream of creating an industry-leading company in the Optics, Photonics and Imaging Industry. The Entrepreneur Award recipient for 2015 is Bob Bicksler, CEO of JML Optical Industries in East Rochester, NY.

Bicksler has served as the President and CEO of JML Optical Industries since the 2011 change of ownership. He is responsible for developing the company’s strategy and has led numerous initiatives to position JML as a leader in the optics industry. Prior to acquiring JML with several partners, Bob served as the President and CEO of a leading provider of software products and services for the mobile device market. Bob has over 30 years of operational and financial background in manufacturing, technology, and telecommunications companies. His track record is one of continued success in growing companies and delivering superior products to a wide range of customers.

Bob is a Lecturer (part-time) of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the University of North Carolina Kenan-Flagler Business School. He is also an active instructor at North Carolina School of Science and Math (NCSSM), part of the UNC system. NCSSM is the world’s first public, residential high school for juniors and seniors that provides a specialized curriculum in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math. Bob holds degrees from The Pennsylvania State University (BS, Business Administration) and The University of North Texas (MS).

 

DuncanMoorePhotoThe RRPC Leadership Award is given each year to an individual for working with RRPC members and the community to promote the Rochester Region’s Optics, Photonics and Imaging Industry. The Leadership Award recipient for 2015 is Dr. Duncan Moore.

Moore is the Rudolf and Hilda Kingslake Professor of Optical Engineering, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, and Professor of Business Administration at the University of Rochester. In 2007, he was also appointed Vice Provost for Entrepreneurship at the University. In this role, he manages the Kauffman Campus Initiative ($10.6M over 5 years). From 1995 to 1997, Dr. Moore was Dean of Engineering and Applied Sciences at the University, and in 1996 he also served as President of the Optical Society of America. The U.S. Senate confirmed Dr. Moore in the fall of 1997 as Associate Director for Technology in The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). In this position, which ended December 2000, he worked with Dr. Neal Lane, President Clinton’s Science Advisor, to advise the President on U.S. technology policy.

Moore has extensive experience in the academic, research, business, and governmental arenas of science and technology. He is an expert in gradient index optics, solar cell design, computer-aided design, and the manufacture of optical systems. In 1993, Dr. Moore began a one-year appointment as Science Advisor to Senator John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia. He also chaired the successful Hubble Independent Optical Review Panel organized in 1990 to determine the correct prescription of the Hubble Space Telescope. He currently chairs the Product-Integrity-Team for the James Webb Space Telescope, the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. He is also the founder and former president of Gradient Lens Corporation of Rochester, NY, a company that manufactures the Hawkeye boroscope. He holds Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in optics from the University of Rochester, and a bachelor’s degree in physics from the University of Maine. Dr. Moore was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in February 1998, and in 2006 Moore received the Gold Medal of The International Society for Optical Engineering (SPIE). Dr. Moore was the recipient of the 2009 Edwin H. Land Medal presented by the Society for Imaging Science and Technology and the Optical Society of America.

Conrow2The RRPC Education Award is given each year to an individual for inspiring students to embrace Optics, Photonics, and Imaging sciences and guiding them in career development. The Education Award recipient for 2015 is East High School Science Teacher Paul Conrow.

Conrow initiated and developed the East High School Optics Manufacturing Lab (Rochester, NY) that includes a complete shop for manufacturing precision optics.  He was the initiator, with New York Photonics Executive Director and a team of volunteers, of the Optics Summer Sizzler, a summer immersion program for teaching students and teachers about optics and photonics.

Conrow helped run a summer physics research program for area high school students, under the direction of Professor Kevin McFarland at the University of Rochester. This paid experience for students required them to refurbish, test, and experiment with several 3’ x 10’ solid scintillating panels.  He has worked with students to perform cosmic ray experiments with scintillating panels on the university campus. The final destination for the panels is FermiLab in Batavia, Illinois as part of a multi-year neutrino experiment that began in 2009.

Rochester’s International Year of Light in Motion

February 24, 2015

Did you know that the stunning lights of aurora borealis are the result of solar wind? Or that every CD and DVD player contains a tiny laser? Or that some people can trick their brains to see “impossible” colors?

Fascinating, right? It’s this fascination with light and an unquenchable interest in researching new concepts that has made the Rochester region a light, imaging and optical technologies worldwide hub.

The United Nations has proclaimed 2015 as the International Year of Light.

Organizations, businesses and museums around the world are planning celebrations to highlight to the citizens of the world the importance of light and optical technologies.

The Rochester Museum & Science Center (RMSC), Rochester Regional Photonics Cluster and other commercial and academic partners have come together to engage the community in a variety of light-based experiences. Partners include the Rochester Institute of Technology, University of Rochester, Monroe Community College, OSA-RS (Optical Society — Rochester Section), ASE Optics, Corning Tropel, IDEX Corporation, Optimax and Second Avenue Learning.

Optics and related technologies offer major benefits to our region, including interesting and well-paying careers in science, engineering and manufacturing. Globally, light-based technologies promote sustainable development and provide solutions to challenges in energy, education, agriculture and health. From the Mars Rover, to Internet communication and revolutionized medicine, optics changes the way we live. We want to raise awareness about how light-based technologies directly respond to the needs of humankind.

Using the International Year of Light as a platform, many local organizations plan to generate interest in optics through hands-on applications. The RMSC plans to host special public light-based programs including “Science of Light Weekends” throughout the first half of 2015 and “Light-a-Palooza” during spring break. A full list of community events is available at RoctheYOL.com.

With zest for light technologies, we’re supporting our own future. Rochester is home to more than 50 optics- and imaging-focused businesses. These local opportunities keep Rochester on the map and our community members here.

Bennett is president of Rochester Museum & Science Center. Cook is general manager, ASE Optics, and president of OSA Rochester Section.

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/opinion/guest-column/2015/01/24/year-light-motion-rochester/22222191/

#ROCtheIYOL #IYOL15 #IYOL2015

“Consider a career in skilled trades,” say Economists

February 3, 2015

As the economy continues to recover, economists are seeing stark differences between people with high school and college degrees. Four-year college graduates are nearly twice as likely to have a job compared to Americans who just graduated high school and stopped there.

But economists say that doesn’t mean everybody needs a four-year degree. In fact, millions of good-paying jobs are opening up in the trades. And some pay better than what the average college graduate makes.

http://www.npr.org/2015/02/02/383335110/economists-say-millennials-should-consider-careers-in-trades

Happy Birthday Marty Dvorin, Founding Professor of the Monroe Community College Optics Program!

January 31, 2015

Martin Dvorin is Professor emeritus of the Optical Systems Technology Program at a Community College.  He began teaching optics at Monroe Community College, on Alexander Street, in Rochester, NY in 1966.

We reprint here a recollection written for us by Marty in 2009, and edited just two months ago.

Happy Birthday Marty!

In the early 1960’s, the Optical Society of America, in a research effort “Optics – an Action Program”, under the direction of its president, Van Zandt Williams, determined that, from retiring and deaths, the United States was losing its optical technicians. Independently, Corwin Brumley, Vice President for R&D at Bausch and Lomb, I, and others around the coffee pot, came to the same conclusion. Optics was changing. We did not have the technicians with the skills needed for present and future projects. All this pointed to an impending national crisis.

One afternoon, in the summer of 1966, while I was working away in my ‘skunk works’ office at Bausch and Lomb, there was a knock on the partition opening that served as a door.

“Martin Dvorin?”  “ The same.  And you are?”  “Frank Milligan, assistant to the Vice President of Faculty at Monroe Community College. May I come in?”

How he was directed to me, I’ll never know, but Dr. Milligan came to ask me to take over the Optical Technology Program at M.C.C. At the time I was Technical Director of a large R&D contract which I could not leave until it was delivered, so we settled for my teaching nights, adjunct, at the ‘campus’, an abandoned high school in downtown Rochester, on Alexander Street.

That first evening, in September 1966, I faced 13 younger Marty Dvorins, when, in 1951, I started my own night school program which concluded a few months previous in the spring of 1966. Among the students present were (the late) Robert Novak and the late Harvey Pollicove. We had a cozy lecture hall, and high school Cenco lab equipment and maybe some from drug stores. We used photographic equipment from the Police Science Department. My shared desk sat in a “bull pen” office, which housed faculty from many departments. (also the late) Dr. Howard Smith of Eastman Kodak was the other part time faculty member.

In the spring of 1968, the B&L project delivered, I could take on full time duties at the College. Since my goal was to teach what would be useful to students in their work, I wanted lots of input from local companies which would hire them, so I visited several in the area and interviewed managers, to fill in a survey that included: equipment the graduates would use, skills they would need, and, most secret, how many would be hired in one, two and five years. The agreement was: information from any one company would be absolutely confidential, but the totals from all companies would be public knowledge. I took the results, and added in a little “technology forecasting” imagining what future developments there might be. All this went into the design of courses and recruiting plans. The advisory committee was pleased with what I presented. Also, I would actively recruit minorities, which in 1968 included women.

The first course in the new campus, a Survey of Optics, for the general public, was presented in the summer of 1968, The first (of my) full-time optics students entered in the fall of 1968, to unfinished facilities. “Blackboards” were corrugated cartons. One day, Dr. James Walsh (yes, deceased), V.P. Faculty, entered and stood quietly in the back of the room. I always invited any member of the faculty to sit in. I was lecturing by the light of my Coleman lantern. Jim had heard of this and wanted to observe it. I was a one-man department, and did a lot of improvisation and construction. Money was tight. Local companies contributed equipment and supplies, and I brought in my own darkroom stuff. Steve Avery (my first student of color) was the first student aide. When he saw me clamber up onto a darkroom counter: “Marty you’re pretty agile for an old guy”. I was forty-five years old- a real old guy!

One morning, Ouida Norris, Chair of Biomedical Engineering Technology, stormed into my sixth floor corner office and showed me a newspaper article saying that, because of financial conditions, the College was investigating canceling her and my programs. Now there were two storming people, barging into the office of Leroy Goode, the College President (yes, died). “Don’t worry, nothing is happening, yet’. Happily. nothing did.

Being a one man department was exhausting me, so I went to the Faculty office, and requested another person. Charles Ball, then in the Audiovisual Department, had expressed interest. But the assistant was adamant. I had in my pocket prepared a letter of resignation, which, until I retired, I always kept in my desk in the event I needed it. (I never did). I flashed it. The guy shrank back, like a vampire does from garlic. Then I went back to my office and called Theron Carter at Kodak.  “Ted, this is Marty. H-E-L-P!”, and hung up the telephone. Somehow, Charlie was transferred to the Optical Technology Department. Rochester industry has always been supportive of the Program. And still is, now in 2012.

Budget money did come in, and we bought better lab equipment from Ealing (I saw a lens bench I bought, in one of your pictures) and others. I called the late Alex Martens, a V.P. at B&L, my alma mater. “Alex, I need a spectrometer”. “Marty, I can’t give you a new one. They are expensive. But I’ll lend you a used one.” “When?” “Oh, I can use one in the next few days.”  Alex, bless him, had one in a raincoat pocket when he came into our lab. Kodak gave us the first lens polishers. 500 plastic containers came from a former employer in Kearney, New Jersey.

Students were coming in; graduates were getting hired. Bob Novak, A.A.S. graduate, having just received his B.S.degree from Arizona University, visited the department. The details are hazy, but Bob joined the department the next semester. Now we were three. And  Howie Smith, of course.

1971 was a watershed year. To widen the market for our graduates, during summers, my late wife Harriette and I motored to New England. We would camp in our 1969 Dodge Sportsman van at Salisbury Beach Park, Mass., and visit companies around Route 128. I signed many confidentiality agreements, saw a lot of ‘company secrets’. Recruiters came from Lawrence Livermore Labs in California, and hired many of our graduates. With four year engineering grads having trouble finding jobs, our story was in the newspapers and on local television. When Dennis Gabor won the Nobel Prize for Holography, Howie and I were invited to explain holography on a morning T.V. program.

The Rochester Section of the O.S.A. held meetings and pre-meeting dinners at the M.C.C. campus, and I was invited to be President of the Rochester O.S.A for the year 1972-1973. In the summer of 1973, Harriette and I drove the van around the U.S.A. and visited Colleges and companies to further expand coverage. Around the Los Angeles area, the S.P.I.E. housed us and arranged for visits to important installations. The Optics Survey went national.

We applied for a federal grant, and were awarded enough money to add, among other things, a Bridgeport milling machine and a Strasbaugh polisher. We hired other people from industry as adjuncts. With an Education Committee, we set up a pioneering transfer program so that graduates from M.C.C. could continue at the Rochester Institute of Technology or the University of Rochester, working towards a B.S.,  M.S., or a PhD degree.

Feature articles describing the optics program were published in Applied Optics and several other international journals. The Optical Engineering Technology program at Monroe had come of age. If not for that visit, I just might have gone over and applied for the job that was offered to me that day in 1966

……Martin Dvorin, Novato, California, October, 2009, rev 10/2014

Photonics NMI Competition Highlights Nation’s Industry

January 29, 2015

From the Rochester Business Journal at   http://www.rbj.net/article.asp?aID=210763

The competition that will award more than $200 million to create a manufacturing institute focused on the photonics industry will be launched soon, and Rochester is a prime candidate, officials announced Friday.

The Department of Defense will lead the competition designed to establish a photonics hub, Sen Charles Schumer, D-NY., said.

Albany also is positioned to be a hub, he said.

“Rochester is the world capital of optics and photonics and that’s why I’ve been fighting like heck for over two years to get this investment,” Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-Perinton, said in a statement.

“What the world wants most in optics and photonics is already being developed right here in Rochester. We’ve got the manufacturing facilities, the research institutions, the highly skilled workforce, and now we have the public-private investment opportunity we need to get this industry to the next level.”

A bill to create several institutes for manufacturing innovation has passed the House of Representatives and is working its way through Congress, Schumer said.

“This manufacturing institute will have a transformative impact on our local economy that will help support the thousands of jobs we already have in this industry, and potentially bring many more to Rochester,” Slaughter said in her statement.

“Our region has been leading the world in optics and photonics for decades, which is why we’re going to pursue this competition aggressively.”

Eastman Business Park, the University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology and the CNSE Smart Systems Technology & Commercialization Center in Canandaigua make the Rochester area an ideal spot, Schumer said.

“I have long been a supporter of Upstate New York’s photonics and optics industry, and have pushed to help create just this type of competition to leverage all of the expertise and technical know-how in photonics—in Rochester, Albany and cities across New York—to build on that strong foundation, create jobs and lead our nation in this cutting-edge industry,” Schumer said, in a statement.

http://www.louise.house.gov/press-releases/slaughter-announces-new-york-has-been-selected-as-a-finalist-to-compete-for-federal-photonics-institute1/

http://www.rochester.edu/newscenter/rochester-competes-for-national-photonics-institute-88132/

http://www.schumer.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/schumer-gillibrand-announce-rochester-suny-proposal-will-advance-to-final-round-of-competition-for-110-million-to-create-new-national-institute-of-photonics_senators-have-supported-effort-and-say-rochester-is-well-positioned-to-win-as-home-of-worlds-greatest-concentration-of-expertise-in-optics-photonics-imaging